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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 465 AD or search for 465 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ma'ximus Taurinensis so called because he was bishop of Turin, flourished about the middle of the fifth century. He subscribed in A. D. 451 the synodic epistle of Eusebius, bishop of Milan, to Leo the Great; and from the circumstance that in the acts of the council of Rome, held in A. D. 465, by Hilarius, the successor of Leo, the signature of Maximus immediately follows that of the chief pontiff, taking precedence of the metropolitans of Milan and Embrun, we may conclude that he was the oldest prelate present. It has been inferred from different passages in his works that he was born about the close of the fourth century, at Vercelli, that he was educated in that city, that he there discharged the first duties of the sacred office, and that he lived to a great age; but it is impossible to speak with certainty upon these points. Works Gennadius, who is followed by Trithemius, states that Maximus composed a great number of tracts and homilies upon various subjects, several of whi
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Seve'rus, Li'bius Roman emperor from A. D. 461-465. He was a Lucanian by birth, and owed his accession to Ricimer, who placed him on the throne of Rome after the assassination of Majorian. His proclamation took place at Ravenna, on the 19th or 20th of November, 461, and the Roman senate confirmed the election soon afterwards. He was an obscure man, and his name is not mentioned previous to the murder of Majorian, of which he was one of the principal agents. No acts of his reign are recorded but one, namely his condemnation of Agrippinus. and the subsequent pardon which he granted to him in 462. Leo, the Eastern emperor, declined to acknowledge him, but afterwards complied with the wishes of the powerful Ricimer, to whom we refer for the political events of the time. Severus died in Rome on the 15th of August, 465, or perhaps some weeks later. (Idatius, Chronicon; Chronicon Alexandr. ; Evagr. 2.7; Theoph. p. 97; Jornand. De Reb. Goth. 100.45.) [W.P]