hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 47 AD or search for 47 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Aelia'nus, Plautius offered up the prayer as pontifex, when the first stone of the new Capitol was laid in A. D. 71. (Tac. Hist. 4.53.) We learn from an inscription (Gruter, p.453; Orelli, n. 750), that his full name was Ti. Plautius Silvanus Aelianus, that he held many important military commands, and that he was twice consul. His first consulship was in A. D. 47; the date of his second is unknown.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or BARDANES (search)
Arsaces Xxi. or BARDANES BARDANES, the brother of the preceding, attempted to recover Armenia, but was deterred from his design by Vibius Marsus, the governor of Syria. He defeated his brother Gotarzes, who had repented of his resignation, and attempted to recover the throne; but his successes led him to treat his subjects with haughtiness, who accordingly put him to death while he was hunting, A. D. 47. His death occasioned fresh disputes for the crown, which was finally obtained by Gotarzes; but as he also governed with cruelty, the Parthians secretly applied to the emperor Claudius, to beg him to send them from Rome Meherdates, the grandson of Phraates IV. Claudius complied with their request, and commanded the governor of Syria to assist Meherdates. Through the treachery of Abgarus, king of Edessa, the hopes of Meherdates were ruined; he was defeated in battle, and taken prisoner by Gotarzes, who died himself shortly afterwards, about A. D. 50. (Tac. Ann. 11.10, 12.10-14.)
d ill A. D. 35, Mithridates invaded Armenia and took its capital, Artaxata. Josephus (18.3.4.) calls this Armenian king Orodes, but this was the name of his brother, who, as we learn from Tacitus, was sent by the Parthian king to revenge his death. (Tac. Ann. 6.31-33; D. C. 58.26.) Mithridates The aforesaid brother of Pharasmanes, was established on the throne of Armenia by the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35. He was recalled to Rome by Caligula, but sent into Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.) Rhadamistus the son of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, was a highly fitted but ambitious youth, whom his old father tied to get rid of by exciting him to invade Armenia, for which purpose he gave him an army. (A. D. 52.) Rhadamistus, seconded by the perfidy of the Roman praefect in Armenia, Pollio, succeeded in seiz
Mithridates The aforesaid brother of Pharasmanes, was established on the throne of Armenia by the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35. He was recalled to Rome by Caligula, but sent into Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.)
Cotys 6. A king of a portion of Thrace, and perhaps one of the sons of No. 5. (See Tac. Ann. 2.67.) In A. D. 38, Caligula gave the whole of Thrace to Rhoemetalces, son of Rhescuporis, and put Cotys in possession of Armenia Minor. In A. D. 47, when Claudius wished to place Mithridates on the throne of Armenia, Cotys endeavoured to obtain it for himself, and had succeeded in attaching some of the nobles to his cause, but was compelled by the commands of the emperor to desist. (D. C. 59.12; Tac. Ann. 11.9.)
Fla'vius a brother of Arminius, chief of the Cheruscans. In the summer of A. D. 16, the Romans and the Cheruscans were drawn up on the opposite banks of the Weser (Visurgis), when Arminius, prince of the Cheruscans, stepped forth from a group of chieftains, and demanded to speak with his brother, a distinguished officer in the Roman army. Flavius had lost an eye in the service of Rome. The brothers, after their followers had fallen back, conversed across the stream. On learning the cause of his brother's disfigurement, Arminius asked what had been its compensation. Flavius replied, increased pay, and the usual rewards of valour. Arminius derided his chains and chaplet, as the gear of a slave; and now began between therm an angry colloquy, which, but for the stream between, would have passed into blows. (Tac. Ann. 2.9.) A descendant of Flavius, named Italicus, became in A. D. 47 chieftain of the Cheruscans. (Ibid. 11.16.) [W.B.D]
Ita'licus one of the two kings of the Suevians who in A. D. 70 joined the party of Vespasian and fought against the Vitellians at Bedriacum in Cisalpine Gaul. (Tac. Hist. 3.5, 21.) He was probably a son of the Italicus mentioned by the same historian (Ann. 11.16) A. D. 47, who was invited to the chieftancy of the Cheruscans, and afterwards for his tyranny and intemperance expelled by them. In most editions of Tacitus the name is Italus, and, whether this or Italicus be the true reading, his Teutonic appellation is probably superseded by an agnomen derived from his education at Rome while detained there as an hostage. [FLAVIUS, p. 174.] [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Marsus, Vi'bius whom Tacitus calls (Ann. 6.47) "vetustis honoribus studiisque illustris," is first mentioned in A. D. 19 as one of the most likely persons to obtain the government of Syria, but he gave way to Cn. Sentius. In the same year he was sent to summon Piso to Rome to stand his trial. His name occurs again in A. D. 26, in the debates of the senate; and just before the death of Tiberius (A. D. 37) he narrowly escaped death, being accused as one of the accomplices of Albucilla. In A. D. 47 we find him governor of Syria. (Tac. Ann. 2.74, 79, 4.56, 6.47, 48, 11.10.) The name of C. Vibius Marsus, proconsul, appears on several coins of Utica in Africa, struck in the reign of Tiberius: they probably relate to the same person as the one mentioned above; and as he was disappointed in obtaining the province of Syria in the reign of Tiberius, he may have been appointed to that of Africa. (Eckhel, vol. iv. pp. 147, 148.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ma'ximus, Sanqui'nius is first mentioned towards the latter end of the reign of Tiberius, A. D. 32, when he is spoken of as a person of consular rank. (Tac. Ann. 6.4.) We learn from Dio Cassius (59.13) and the Fasti that he was consul A. D. 39, in the reign of Caligula, but from the passage of Tacitus quoted above, he must have been consul previously, though his first consulship does not occur in the Fasti. He also held the office of praefectus urbi in the reign of Caligula. (Dio Cass. l.c.) In the reign of Claudiushe had the command in Lower Germany, and died in the province, A. D. 47. (Tac. Ann. 11.18.) He seems to have been a different person from Sanquinius, the accuser of Arruntius. (Tac. Ann. 6.7.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
lina was safe so long as the freedmen felt themselves secure; but when her malice or her rashness endangered her accomplices, her doom was inevitable. She had procured the death of Polybius, and Narcissus perceived the frail tenure of his own station and life. The insane folly of Messallina, in A. D. 48, furnished the means of her own destruction. Hitherto she had been content with the usual excesses of a profligate age, with the secrecy of the palace, or the freedom of the brothel. But in A. D. 47 she had conceived a violent passion for a handsome Roman youth, C. Silius. She compelled him to divorce his wife Junia Silana, and in return discarded her favourite Mnester. In 48, her passion broke through the last restraints of decency and prudence, and, during the absence of Claudius at Ostia, she publicly married Silius with all the rites of a legal connubium. Messallina had wrought upon the fears of Claudius for the destruction of others; those fears were now turned against herself. Na
1 2