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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 4 4 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Aste'rius, Turcius Rufus Apronia'nus was consul A. D. 494, devoted himself to literary pursuits, and emended a MS. of Sedulius, and one of Virgil, on which he wrote an epigram. (Anth. Lat. No. 281, ed. Meyer.) [C.P.M]
Elias ELIAS. There were three patriarchs of Jerusalem of this name. Elias I. 1. Elias I. was patriarch from A. D. 494 or 495 till his deposition by a council held at Sidon, whose decree was enforced, A. D. 513, by the emperor Anastasius I. He died in exile A. D. 518. Elias Ii. 2. Elias II. held the patriarchate from A. D. 760, or earlier, to 797, with the exception of an interval, when he was expelled by an intrusive patriarch Theodorus. He was represented at the second general council of Nicaea, A. D. 787, by Joannes, a presbyter, and Thomas, principal of the convent of St. Arsenius near Babylon in Egypt: these ecclesiastics were also representatives of the patriarchs of Alexandria and Antioch. Elias Iii. 3. Elias III. was patriarch at least as early as 881, when he sent a letter to Charles le Gros and the prelates, princes, and nobles of Gaul. Elias died about A. D. 907. Works Letter to Charlemagne Editions A Latin version of the letter of Elias to Charlemagne (fo
Elias I. 1. Elias I. was patriarch from A. D. 494 or 495 till his deposition by a council held at Sidon, whose decree was enforced, A. D. 513, by the emperor Anastasius I. He died in exile A. D. 518.
H. E. 3.7, 4.10, 5.7; Theodoret, H. E. 2.14; Philostorg. H. E. (apud. Phot.) 7.2; Vita Athanasii, apud Phot. Bibl. Cod. 258.) It is difficult either to trace or to account for the introduction of the odious George among the saints of the Romish and Greek churches; and it is to be observed that the identification of the bishop of Alexandria with the St. George of the calendar is stoutly objected to by some Roman Catlolic and some Anglican writers -- for instance, Papebroche and Heylyn. In A. D. 494 (or perhaps 496) his rank as a canonised saint was recognized by Pope Gelasius I. at a coancil at Rome, but his "gesta" were rejected as Apocryphal, and written by heretics; a probable intimation that the facts of his history had not yet been sufficiently perverted to be received. As time proceeded, various fabulous and absurd "Acta" were produced, which Papebroche admits to be unworthy of credit. The Greek "Acta" are considered by him as more trustworthy; but he does not place even them i