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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Agathe'merus, Claudius (*Klau/dios *)Agaqh/meros), an ancient Greek physician, who lived in the first century after Christ. He was born at Lacedaemon, and was a pupil of the philosopher Cornutus, in whose house he became acquainted with the poet Persius about A. D. 50. (Pseudo-Sueton. vita Persii.) In the old editions of Suetonius he is called Agaternus, a mistake which was first corrected by Reinesius (Syntagma Inscript. Antiq. p. 610), from the epitaph upon him and his wife, Myrtale, which is preserved in the Marmora Oxoniensia and the Greek Anthology, vol. iii. p. 3811.224, ed. Tauchn. The apparent anomaly of a Roman praenomen being given to a Greek, may be accounted for by the fact which we learn from Suetonius (Suet. Tib. 6), that the Spartans were the hereditary clients of the Claudia Gens. Further Information C. G. Kühn, Additam. ad Elench. Medic. Vet. a J. A. Fabricio, in "Biblioth. Gracca" eahibit. [W.A
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
A'quila, Ju'lius a Roman knight, stationed with a few cohorts, in A. D. 50, to protect Cotys, king of the Bosporus, who had received the sovereignty after the expulsion of Mithridates. In the same year, Aquila obtained the praetorian insignia. (Tac. Ann. 12.15, 21.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or BARDANES (search)
Arsaces Xxi. or BARDANES BARDANES, the brother of the preceding, attempted to recover Armenia, but was deterred from his design by Vibius Marsus, the governor of Syria. He defeated his brother Gotarzes, who had repented of his resignation, and attempted to recover the throne; but his successes led him to treat his subjects with haughtiness, who accordingly put him to death while he was hunting, A. D. 47. His death occasioned fresh disputes for the crown, which was finally obtained by Gotarzes; but as he also governed with cruelty, the Parthians secretly applied to the emperor Claudius, to beg him to send them from Rome Meherdates, the grandson of Phraates IV. Claudius complied with their request, and commanded the governor of Syria to assist Meherdates. Through the treachery of Abgarus, king of Edessa, the hopes of Meherdates were ruined; he was defeated in battle, and taken prisoner by Gotarzes, who died himself shortly afterwards, about A. D. 50. (Tac. Ann. 11.10, 12.10-14.)
Cartimandua or CARTISMANDUA, queen of the Brigantes in Britain, about A. D. 50, in which year she treacherously delivered up to the Romans Caractacus, who had come to seek her protection. By this act of treachery towards her own countrymen, she won the favour of the Romans, and increased her power. Hence, says Tacitus, arose wealth and luxury, and Cartimandua repudiated her own husband Venutius to share her bed and throne with Vellocatus, the arm-bearer of her husband. This threw her state into a civil war, a portion of her people supporting Venutius against the adulterer. Venutius collected an army of auxiliaries, defeated the Brigantes, and reduced Cartimandua to the last extremity. She solicited the aid of the Romans, who rescued her from her danger; but Venutius remained in possession of her kingdom, A. D. 69. (Tac. Ann. 12.36, 40, Hist. iii 45.) [L.S]
Cilo, Ju'nius procurator of Pontus in the reign of Claudius, brought the Bosporan Mithridates to Rome in A. D. 50, and received after wards the consular insignia. (Tac. Ann. 12.21.) Dio Cassius speaks (1x. 33) of him as governor of Bithynia, and relates an amusing tale respecting him. The Bithynians came before Claudius to complain of Cilo having taken bribes, but as the emperor could not hear them on account of the noise, he asked those standing by his side what they said. Narcissus thereupon told him that they were returning thanks to Cilo, upon which Claudius appointed him to the government of the pro vince for two years longer.
Cotys 7. King of the Bosporus, which he received from the Romans on the expulsion of his brother Mithridates. As only a few cohorts under Julius Aquila had been left in the country to support the new king, who was himself young and inexperienced, Mithridates endeavoured to recover his dominions by force of arms, A. D. 50; but he was conquered and carried prisoner to Rome. (Tac. Ann. 12.15-21.) The second of the coins figured on p. 777a. belongs to this Cotys, who is sometimes called Cotys I., king of the Bosporus. The coin given below belongs to Cotys II., who reigned under Hadrian, and is mentioned by Arrian in his Periplus. The obverse represents the head of Cotys, the reverse that of Hadrian. (Eckhel, ii. pp. 376, 378.) [E.E]
called by Suidas a most eminent man, who rose to the height of Greek erudition. He is said to have first studied at Athens, and afterwards at Heliopolis in Egypt. When he observed in Egypt the eclipse of the sun, which occurred during the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, he is said to have exclaimed, " either God himself is suffering, or he sympathises with some one who is suffering." On his return to Athens he was made one of the council of the Areiopagus, whence he derives his surname. About A. D. 50, when St. Paul preached at Athens, Dionysius became a Christian (The Acts, 17.34), and it is said that he was not only the first bishop of Athens, but that he was installed in that office by St. Paul himself. (Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 3.4, 4.23; Suidas.) He is further said to have died the death of a martyr under most cruel tortures. Whether Dionysius Areiopageita ever wrote anything, is highly uncertain; but there exists under his name a number of works of a mystico-Christian nature, which conta
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
having parted with his gift, replied that she had eaten it, and confirmed her assertion by an oath. This falsehood increased the emperor's suspicions that Eudocia regarded Paulinus with undue affection; and he banished him to Cappadocia, where he was either then or afterwards put to death. Marcellinus places his death in the fifth consulship of Valentinian A. D. 440; but we prefer the statement of Nicephorus, that his banishment was after 442-3, and are disposed to place his death in A. D. 449-50. Eudocia, however, soothed for a time the jealousy of her husband, but it was not eradicated, as subsequent events shewed. Gibbon rejects the whole story of the apple " as fit only for the Arabian Nights ;" but his scepticism appears unreasonable. The quarrels of the ecclesiastics were the immediate occasion of her downfall. Chrysaphius, the eunuch and head chamberlain, a supporter of the monk Eutyches, wished to procure the deposition of Flavian, patriarch of Constantinople, who had just be
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Gallus, A. Di'dius was curator aquarum in the reign of Caligula, A. D. 40. In the reign of Claudius, A. D. 50, he commanded a Roman army in Bosporus, and subsequently he was appointed by the same emperor to succeed Ostonus in Britain, where, however, he confined himself to protecting what the Romans had gained before, for he was then at an advanced age, and governed his province through his legates. In his earlier years he seems to have been a man of great ambition, and of some eminence as an orator. (Frontin. de Aquaed. 102; Tac. Ann. 12.15, 40, 14.29, Agric. 14 ; Quint. Inst. 6.3.68.) [L.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Longi'nus, Ca'ssius 19. C. Cassius Longinus, the celebrated jurist, was governor of Syria, A. D. 50, in the reign of Claudius, and conducted to the Euphrates Meherdates, whom the Parthians had desired to have as their king. Though there was no war at that time, Cassius endeavoured, by introducing stricter discipline into the army and keeping the troops well trained, to maintain the high reputation which his family enjoyed in the province. [See above, No. 11.] On his return to Rome he was regarded as one of the leading men in the state, and possessed great influence both by the integrity of his character and his ample fortune. On these accounts he became an object of suspicion to the emperor Nero, who imputed to him as a crime that, among his ancestral images, he had a statue of Cassius, the murderer of Caesar, and accordingly required the senate to pronounce a sentence of banishment against him, A. D. 66. This order was, of course, obeyed, and Cassius was removed to the island of Sard
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