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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 512 AD or search for 512 AD in all documents.

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Epipha'nius 5. Of CONSTANTINOPLE. On the death of Joannes or John II., the Cappadocian, patriarch of Constantinople, Epiphanius, then a preshyter, was chosen to succeed him : he had been the "syncellus" or personal attendant (the functions of the syncellus are not determined) of his predecessor. The election of Epiphanius is stated by Theophanes to have taken place in Feb. A. D. 512 of the Alexandrian computation, equivalent to A. D. 519 or probably 520 of the common era; the account, transmitted only four days after his ordination, to pope Hormisdas, by the deacon Dioscurus, then at Constantinople, as one of the legates of the Roman see, given by Labbe (Concilia, vol. iv. p. 1523), was received at Rome on the 7th of April, A. D. 520, which must therefore have been the year of his election. He occupied the see from A. D. 520 till his death in A. D. 535. Theophanes places his death in June, A. D. 529, Alex. comput. = A. D. 536 of the common era, after a patriarchate of sixteen years
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Saba or Saba Hamartolus or St. Saba (search)
orty-fifth, as Cave affirms, he received ordination as presbyter. He was the founder of some other monastic societies beside that of Magna Laura; and was appointed by the Patriarch of Jerusalem archimandrite of the anchorets of Palestine. But the peace of these solitaries was disturbed by the seditious proceedings of some of them; and by the disputes occasioned by the revival and progress of Origenistic and other opinions [ORIGENES] regarded by Saba as heretical. In his seventy-third year (A. D. 512) Saba was sent, with some other heads of the anchorets of Palestine, by Elias I., patriarch of Jerusalem, to avert the displeasure of the Eastern emperor Anastasius, who, in consequence of the great monophysite schism, was at variance with the patriarch. The great reputation of Saba secured for him a gracious reception at court, and several gifts and favours from the emperor: the gold he distributed among the monasteries of which he was the founder or the virtual superior. His interpositio
n what year Severus went to Constantinople, or how long he abode there, is not clear. Tillemont places his arrival in A. D. 510; but he probably relied on a passage in Theophanes (Chronoy. ad A. M. 6002) which is ambiguous. The fellow-monks for whom Severus came to plead, were partisans of Peter Mongus [PETRUS, No. 22.]; and Severus, because he had formerly anathematized Peter, was reproached with inconsistency in taking their part (Liberat l.c.). He appears to have been at Constantinople, A. D. 512; when, in consequence of the disturbances, excited on account of Flavian, patriarch of Antioch [FLAVIANUS, Ecclesiastics, No. 2.], that prelate was deposed and banished to Petra in Idumaea (Evagr. H. E. 3.32), and Anastasius eagerly seized the opportunity afforded by this vacancy to procure the appointment of Severus to the patriarchate. The appointment was most offensive to the orthodox party. Whether Anastasius or Severus took any steps to abate its offensiveness is not clear. A letter o
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Seve'rus or Seve'rus Bar (search)
n what year Severus went to Constantinople, or how long he abode there, is not clear. Tillemont places his arrival in A. D. 510; but he probably relied on a passage in Theophanes (Chronoy. ad A. M. 6002) which is ambiguous. The fellow-monks for whom Severus came to plead, were partisans of Peter Mongus [PETRUS, No. 22.]; and Severus, because he had formerly anathematized Peter, was reproached with inconsistency in taking their part (Liberat l.c.). He appears to have been at Constantinople, A. D. 512; when, in consequence of the disturbances, excited on account of Flavian, patriarch of Antioch [FLAVIANUS, Ecclesiastics, No. 2.], that prelate was deposed and banished to Petra in Idumaea (Evagr. H. E. 3.32), and Anastasius eagerly seized the opportunity afforded by this vacancy to procure the appointment of Severus to the patriarchate. The appointment was most offensive to the orthodox party. Whether Anastasius or Severus took any steps to abate its offensiveness is not clear. A letter o