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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 21 21 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book II, section 247 (search)
ment to come," Acts 24:5; and no wonder, when we have elsewhere seen that he lived in adultery with Drusilla, another man's wife, (Antiq. B. XX. ch. 7. sect. 1) in the words of Tacitus, produced here by Dean Aldrich: "Felix exercised," says Tacitas, "the authority of a king, with the disposition of a slave, and relying upon the great power of his brother Pallas at court, thought he might safely be guilty of all kinds of wicked practices." Observe also the time when he was made procurator, A.D. 52; that when St. Paul pleaded his cause before him, A.D. 58, he might have been "many years a judge unto that nation," as St. Paul says he had then been, Acts 24:10. But as to what Tacitus here says, that before the death of Cumanus, Felix was procurator over Samaria only, does not well agree with St. Paul's words, who would hardly have called Samaria a Jewish nation. In short, since what Tacitus here says is about countries very remote from Rome, where he lived; since what he says of two Roman
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK II. AN ACCOUNT OF THE WORLD AND THE ELEMENTS., CHAP. 113.—THE HARMONICAL PROPORTION OF THE UNIVERSE. (search)
tus and held in high estimation by the Emperor Adrian., FabianusFabianus Papirius, a Roman rhetorician and naturalist, whose works are highly commended by Pliny and Seneca. He wrote a History of Animals, and a book on Natural Causes., AntiasQuintus Valerius Antias. He flourished about B.C. 80, and wrote the Annals of Rome, down to the time of Sylla., MucianusMarcus Licinius Crassus Mucianus. He was instrumental in raising the Emperor Vespasian to the throne, and was Consul in the years A.D. 52, 70, and 74. He published three Books of Epistles, and a History in eleven Books, which appears to have treated chiefly of Eastern affairs., CæcinaAulus Cæcina. He was sent into exile by Cæsar, joined the Pompeians in Africa, and was taken prisoner by Cæsar, but his life was spared. Cicero wrote several letters to him, and commends his abilities. His work appears to have been on Divination as practised by the Etrurians., who wrote on the Etruscan discipline, TarquitiusHe appears to have been a
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ANIO NOVUS (search)
ANIO NOVUS * an aqueduct, which, like the aqua Claudia, was begun by Caligula in 38 A.D. (Suet. Cal. 21) and completed in 52 A.D. by Claudius, who dedicated them both on 1st August. The cost of the two was 350,000,000 sesterces, or £3,500,000 sterling (Plin. NH xxxvi. 122; Frontinus, de aquis, i. 4, 13, 15, 18-2 ; ii. 68, 72, 73, 86, 90, 91, 93, 104, 15 ; Suet. Claud. 20; CIL vi. 1256; ix. 4051). Originally the water was taken from the river Anio at the forty-second mile of the via Sublacensis; but, as the water was apt to be turbid, Trajan made use of the two uppermost of the three lakes formed by Nero for the adornment of his villa at Subiaco-the Simbruina stagna of Tac. Ann. xiv. 22 (NS 1883, 19; 1884, 425; Giovannoni, Monas teri di Subiaco i. 273 sqq.), thus lengthening the aqueduct to 58 miles 700 paces. The length of 62 miles given to the original aqueduct in the inscription of Claudius on the PORTA MAIOR (q.v.) must be an error for 52; for an unsuccessful attempt to explai
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
a (?), 425; Statues in Temple of Augustus, 62; marble carceres in Circus Maximus, 116; Horti Pallantiani, 270; terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 41 Arch for German victories (?), 36. 43Ara Pietatis Augustae dedicated, 390. 45(before). Facade of Carcer (?), 100. 44-45Cippi of Aqua Virgo, 29. 46Restores Aqua Virgo, 29, 35. 47Aqua Claudia completed (?), 22. 49Pomerium extended to include Aventine, 66, 393. 51-52Arch of Claudius carrying Aqua Virgo over the Via Lata, 29, 35. 52Anio Novus completed, 11. Aqua Claudia dedicated, 22. Porta Praenestina (Maggiore), 412. 54-68Reign of Nero: before 64 A.D. Nero builds Domus Transitoria, 194 ff.; removes Euripus in Circus Maximus, 116, 203; Agrippina begins Temple of Claudius, 120. 58Ficus Navia withers, 208. 58-62Arch of Nero on Capitol, 41. 59Macellum Magnum, 323. 62Trophies of Nero, 542. Gymnasium of Nero built and burnt in the same year, 249. 62 or 64Thermae Neronianae, 531. 63Temple of Fecunditas vow
Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.) Rhadamistus the son of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, was a highly fitted but ambitious youth, whom his old father tied to get rid of by exciting him to invade Armenia, for which purpose he gave him an army. (A. D. 52.) Rhadamistus, seconded by the perfidy of the Roman praefect in Armenia, Pollio, succeeded in seizing upon the person of his uncle, whom he put to death with his wife and his children. Rhadamistus then ascended the throne; butus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second o
Mithridates The aforesaid brother of Pharasmanes, was established on the throne of Armenia by the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35. He was recalled to Rome by Caligula, but sent into Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.)
Rhadamistus the son of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, was a highly fitted but ambitious youth, whom his old father tied to get rid of by exciting him to invade Armenia, for which purpose he gave him an army. (A. D. 52.) Rhadamistus, seconded by the perfidy of the Roman praefect in Armenia, Pollio, succeeded in seizing upon the person of his uncle, whom he put to death with his wife and his children. Rhadamistus then ascended the throne; but Vologeses I., the king of the Parthians, took advantage of the distracted state of the country to send his brother Tiridates into Armenia, and proclaim him king. Tiridates advanced upon Tigranocerta, took this city and Artaxata, and compelled Rhadamistus to fly. Rhadamistus was subsequently killed by his father Pharasmanes. (Tac. Ann. 12.44-51, 13.6, 37.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ba'rea Soranus must not be confounded with Q. Marcius Barea, who was consul suffectus in A. D. 26. The gentile name of Barea Soranus seems to have been Servilius, as Servilia was the name of his daughter. Soranus was consul suffectus in A. D. 52 under Claudius, and afterwards proconsul of Asia. By his justice and zeal in the administration of the province he incurred the hatred of Nero, and was accordingly accused by Ostorius Sabinus, a Roman knight, in A. D. 66. The charges brought against him were his intimacy with Rubellius Plautus [PLAUTUS], and the design of gaining over the province of Asia for the purpose of a revolution. His daughter Servilia was also accused for having given money to the Magi, whom she had consulted respecting her father's danger: she was under twenty years of age, and was the wife of Annius Pollio, who had been banished by Nero. Both Soranus and his daughter were condemned to death, and were allowed to choose the mode of their execution. The chief witness ag
Burrus or BURRHUS, AFRANIUS, a distinguished Roman general under Claudius and Nero, who was appointed by Claudius sole praefectus praetorio, A. D. 52, upon the recommendation of Agrippina, the wife of the emperor, as she hoped to obtain more influence over the praetorian cohorts by one man being their praefect instead of two, especially as Burrus was made to feel that he owed his elevation to her. Burrus and Seneca conducted the education of Nero, and although they were men of very different pursuits, yet they agreed in their endeavours to bring up the young prince in virtuous habits. When Claudius died in A. D. 55, Burrus accompanied Nero from the palace to the praetorians, who, at the command of their praefect, received Nero with loud acclamations. It appears, indeed, that Nero owed his elevation to the throne chiefly to the influence of Burrus. The executions which Agrippina ordered in the beginning of Nero's reign were strenuously opposed by Burrus and Seneca. When Nero had given
Caspe'rius a centurion who served under the prefect Caelius Pollio, and commanded the garrison of a stronghold called Gorneae in A. D. 52, during a war between the Armenians and Hiberians. Caelius Pollio acted the part of a traitor towards the Armenians, but found an honest opponent in Casperius, who endeavoured, though in vain, to induce the Hiberians to raise the siege. In A. D. 62 we find him still serving as centurion in Armenia, and Corbulo sent him as ambassador to Vologeses to expostulate with him respecting his conduct. (Tac. Ann. 12.45, 15.5.) [L.S]
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