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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 21 21 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 52 AD or search for 52 AD in all documents.

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Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.) Rhadamistus the son of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, was a highly fitted but ambitious youth, whom his old father tied to get rid of by exciting him to invade Armenia, for which purpose he gave him an army. (A. D. 52.) Rhadamistus, seconded by the perfidy of the Roman praefect in Armenia, Pollio, succeeded in seizing upon the person of his uncle, whom he put to death with his wife and his children. Rhadamistus then ascended the throne; butus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second o
Mithridates The aforesaid brother of Pharasmanes, was established on the throne of Armenia by the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35. He was recalled to Rome by Caligula, but sent into Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.)
Rhadamistus the son of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, was a highly fitted but ambitious youth, whom his old father tied to get rid of by exciting him to invade Armenia, for which purpose he gave him an army. (A. D. 52.) Rhadamistus, seconded by the perfidy of the Roman praefect in Armenia, Pollio, succeeded in seizing upon the person of his uncle, whom he put to death with his wife and his children. Rhadamistus then ascended the throne; but Vologeses I., the king of the Parthians, took advantage of the distracted state of the country to send his brother Tiridates into Armenia, and proclaim him king. Tiridates advanced upon Tigranocerta, took this city and Artaxata, and compelled Rhadamistus to fly. Rhadamistus was subsequently killed by his father Pharasmanes. (Tac. Ann. 12.44-51, 13.6, 37.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ba'rea Soranus must not be confounded with Q. Marcius Barea, who was consul suffectus in A. D. 26. The gentile name of Barea Soranus seems to have been Servilius, as Servilia was the name of his daughter. Soranus was consul suffectus in A. D. 52 under Claudius, and afterwards proconsul of Asia. By his justice and zeal in the administration of the province he incurred the hatred of Nero, and was accordingly accused by Ostorius Sabinus, a Roman knight, in A. D. 66. The charges brought against him were his intimacy with Rubellius Plautus [PLAUTUS], and the design of gaining over the province of Asia for the purpose of a revolution. His daughter Servilia was also accused for having given money to the Magi, whom she had consulted respecting her father's danger: she was under twenty years of age, and was the wife of Annius Pollio, who had been banished by Nero. Both Soranus and his daughter were condemned to death, and were allowed to choose the mode of their execution. The chief witness ag
Burrus or BURRHUS, AFRANIUS, a distinguished Roman general under Claudius and Nero, who was appointed by Claudius sole praefectus praetorio, A. D. 52, upon the recommendation of Agrippina, the wife of the emperor, as she hoped to obtain more influence over the praetorian cohorts by one man being their praefect instead of two, especially as Burrus was made to feel that he owed his elevation to her. Burrus and Seneca conducted the education of Nero, and although they were men of very different pursuits, yet they agreed in their endeavours to bring up the young prince in virtuous habits. When Claudius died in A. D. 55, Burrus accompanied Nero from the palace to the praetorians, who, at the command of their praefect, received Nero with loud acclamations. It appears, indeed, that Nero owed his elevation to the throne chiefly to the influence of Burrus. The executions which Agrippina ordered in the beginning of Nero's reign were strenuously opposed by Burrus and Seneca. When Nero had given
Caspe'rius a centurion who served under the prefect Caelius Pollio, and commanded the garrison of a stronghold called Gorneae in A. D. 52, during a war between the Armenians and Hiberians. Caelius Pollio acted the part of a traitor towards the Armenians, but found an honest opponent in Casperius, who endeavoured, though in vain, to induce the Hiberians to raise the siege. In A. D. 62 we find him still serving as centurion in Armenia, and Corbulo sent him as ambassador to Vologeses to expostulate with him respecting his conduct. (Tac. Ann. 12.45, 15.5.) [L.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Crispi'nus, Ru'fius a Roman eques and contemporary of the emperors Claudius and Nero. He was praefectus praetorio under Claudius, who employed him in arresting and dragging to Rome Valerius Asiaticus. For this service he was rewarded by a large sum of money and the insignia of the quaestorship. In A. D. 52 he was removed from his office at the instigation of Agrippina, who believed him to be attached to the children of Messalina. Crispinus was married to the notorious Poppaea Sabina, who had a son by him, bearing the same name as his father. She afterwards became the mistress of Nero, and the circumstance, that she had once been the wife of Crispinus, was a sufficient reason for the tyrant to send Crispinus into exile to Sardinia, A. D. 66, under the pretext of his being an accomplice in aconspiracy. Shortly after when Crispinus received the sentence of death, he put an end to his own life. (Tac. Ann. 11.1, 4, 12.42, 13.45, 15.71, 16.17; Senec. Octavia, 728 &c.; Plut. Galba, 19.) His
Domitia'nus or with his full name T. FLAVIUS DOMITIANUS AUGUSTUS, was the younger of Vespasian's sons by his first wife Domitilla. He succeeded his elder brother Titus as emperor, and reigned from A. D. 81 to 96. He was born at Rome, on the 24th of October, A. D. 52, the year in which his father was consul designatus. Suetonius relates that Domitian in his youth led such a wretched life, that he never used a silver vessel, and that he prostituted himself for money. The position which his father then occupied precludes the possibility of ascribing this mode of life to poverty, and if the account be true, we must attribute this conduct to his bad natural disposition. When Vespasian was proclaimed emperor, Domitian, who was then eighteen years old, happened to be at Rome, where he and his friends were persecuted by Vitellius; Sabinus, Vespasian's brother, was murdered, and it was only with the greatest difficulty that Domitian escaped from the burning temple of the capitol, and concealed
Geta, Lu'sius praetorian prefect under Claudius I. A. D. 48. He was superseded during the arrest of the empress Messalina by the freedman Narcissus, and deprived of his prefecture in A. D. 52, by Agrippina, who regarded him as a creature of Messalina's, and attached to her son Britannicus. (Tac. Ann. 11.31.33, 12.42.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Mucia'nus, Lici'nius three times consul in A. D. 52, 70, and 75 respectively, must have passed by adoption from the Mucian to the Licinian gens. His character is drawn in a few strokes by the masterly hand of Tacitus. (Hist. 1.10.) He was alike distinguished for good and for evil, for luxurious indulgence and energetic work, for affability and haughtiness; when he had nothing to attend to, he revelled in excessive pleasures; but when business required his attention, he displayed great abilities. Thus his public conduct deserved praise, his private condemnation. As a youth, he courted with assiduity the favour of the powerful, and succeeded in obtaining the consulship in the reign of Claudius, A. D. 52; but having squandered his property, and becoming likewise an object of suspicion to Claudius, he went into retirement in Asia, and there lived, says Tacitus, as near to the condition of an exile as afterwards to that of an emperor. We gather from Pliny (Plin. Nat. 12.1. s. 5) that the p
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