hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 10 10 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 11 results in 9 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
seum), 6: Porticus Nova, 429. 443Thermae Constantinianae restored, 525. 450Forum Esquilinum restored, 224. 455Vandal invasion, 235. 468-483Basilica of Junius Bassus becomes a Church, 81. 470Earthquake injures Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6. Rostra Vandalica, 235, 453. 493-526Reign of Theodoric: he repairs Forum, 235: the walls, 349: Atrium Libertatis, 56; restores and alters Palatine Hippodrome, 163-4. 508(?) Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum) restored after earthquake, 7. 507-511Theatre of Pompey restored, 517. 523Last venationes in Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 7. 526-527Temple of Divus Romulus converted into a church, 450. 535Library of Pope Agapetus, 181. 535-536Theodohad preserves statues in Forum, 235. 537Aqua Traiana cut by Vitigis and restored by Belisarius, 28. 549Last games in Circus Maximus, 119. 571Narses removes statues from Capitoline Temple, 301. 608Column in Forum dedicated to Phocas, 133. 609Pantheon dedicated as a church.
Belisa'rius 2. The Gothic war consists of two acts, the first (A. D. 535-540), the second (A. D. 544-548). The first began in the claims laid by Justinian to Sicily, and in his demand for the abdication of the feeble Gothic king, Theodatus. It was marked by Belisarius's conquest of Sicily (535) and Naples (537), by his successful defence of Rome against the newly elected and energetic king of the Goths, Vitiges (March, 537--March, 538), and by the capture of Ravenna with Vitiges himself, Dec. en well compared to Marlborough, except so far as the great Sarah was superior to the infamous Antonina. To her influence over him are to be ascribed the only great blots of his life--the execution of his officer, Constantine (Procop. ibid. 1), A. D. 535, the persecution of his step-son, Photius (Ibid. 1-3), A. D. 540, and the deposition of the pope Sylverius and the corrupt election of Vigilius, A. D. 537. (Goth. 1.25.) He had by Antonina an only daughter, Joannina. (Procop. Hist. Arcan. 1.5,G
Cosmas (*Kosma=s), commonly called INDICOPLEUSTES (Indian navigator), an Egyptian monk, who flourished in the reign of Justinian, about A. D. 535. In early life he followed the employment of a merchant, and was extensively engaged in traffic. He navigated the Red Sea, advanced to India, visited various nations, Ethiopia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, and almost all places of the East. Impelled, as it would appear, more by curiosity than by desire of gain, eager to inspect the habits and manners of distant people, he carried on a commerce amid dangers sufficient to appal the most adventurous. There is abundant reason for believing, that he was an attentive observer of every thing that met his eye, and that he carefully registered his remarks upon the scenes and objects which presented themselves. But a migratory life became irksome. After many years spent in this manner, he bade adieu to worldly occupations, took up his residence in a monastery, and devoted himself to a contemplative life.
not occur in the context referred to. Comments upon the Code and the Basilica Cyrillus also commented upon the Code. (Bus. iii. pp. 60, 61.) Sometimes he is quoted by the scholiasts on the Basilica, and sometimes his opinions are embodied in the text. (Bas. v. pp. 44, 82, 431, Bas. iv. p. 410.) No comments upon the Novells He does not appear to have commented upon the Novells; and Reiz (ad Theoph. pp. 1235, 1245) has observed, that both Cyrillus and Stephanus must have written before A. D. 535, when the 115th Novell was promulgated. In Bas. 5.225 is a quotation from Cyrillus stating the law de Inofficioso Testamento as it existed before it was altered by the 115th Novell, which an eminent jurist could scarcely have overlooked or been ignorant of. Two jurists named Cyrillus? C. E. Zachariae seems to think that there were two jurists named Cyrillus: one, who was among the preceptors of the jurists that flourished in the time of Justinian; another, who was among the jurists that
n place in Feb. A. D. 512 of the Alexandrian computation, equivalent to A. D. 519 or probably 520 of the common era; the account, transmitted only four days after his ordination, to pope Hormisdas, by the deacon Dioscurus, then at Constantinople, as one of the legates of the Roman see, given by Labbe (Concilia, vol. iv. p. 1523), was received at Rome on the 7th of April, A. D. 520, which must therefore have been the year of his election. He occupied the see from A. D. 520 till his death in A. D. 535. Theophanes places his death in June, A. D. 529, Alex. comput. = A. D. 536 of the common era, after a patriarchate of sixteen years and three months; but Pagi (Critic. in Baronii Annales ad ann. 535, No. lviii.) shortens this calculation by a year. Epiphanius was one of the saints of the Greek calendar, and is mentioned in the Menologium translated by Sirletus, but not in that of the emperor Basil. He was succeeded by Anthimus, bishop of Trapezus. Some Letters of Epiphanius to pope Hormi
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Petrus PATRICIUS (search)
strogothic king, of the marriage of Amalasuntha and Theodatus and their exaltation to the throne of Italy, and of their subsequent dissensionsand the imprisonment of Amalasuntha. heconsequently despatched intelligence of these important events to the emperor, while he himself waited at Aulon for further instructions. Justinian, without delay, undertook to vindicate the cause of the imprisoned queen, and directed Peter to declare his purpose openly to Theodatus. Peter immediately proceeded (A. D. 535), to Italy; but his arrival was speedily followed by the murder of Amalasuntha, an event extremely opportune for the ambitious views of Justinian, who. through Peter, immediately declared war against the Ostrogoths, on account of the queen's death. Such is the account given in one place by Procopius (ibid. 100.4); but he elsewhere (Hist. Arcan. 100.16) charges Peter with instigating Theodatus to commit the murder, being secretly commissioned to do so by the jealousy of Theodora, Justinian'
ned to the side of Severus. After the death of Justin, and the accession of Justinian I., the prospects of Severus became more favourable ; for although the new emperor himself [JUSTINIANUS I.] supported the Council of Chalcedon, his empress Theodora favoured the Monophysite party, and by her influence Severus obtained the emperor's permission to return to Constantinople (Evagrius. l.c.). On his arrival, Severus found that Anthimus, who had just obtained the patriarchate of Constantinople, A. D. 535, was a Monophysite, and he prevailed on him to avow his sentiments. Timotheus of Alexandria was a Monophysite also, and the avowal of that obnoxious heresy by the heads of the church, naturally excited the alarm of the orthodox party. Anthimus and Timotheus were both deposed; and in the councils of Constantinople and Jerusalem (A. D. 536), and in an imperial edict, Severus was again anathematized ; his writings also were ordered to be burned. These decisive measures secured the predominanc
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Seve'rus or Seve'rus Bar (search)
ned to the side of Severus. After the death of Justin, and the accession of Justinian I., the prospects of Severus became more favourable ; for although the new emperor himself [JUSTINIANUS I.] supported the Council of Chalcedon, his empress Theodora favoured the Monophysite party, and by her influence Severus obtained the emperor's permission to return to Constantinople (Evagrius. l.c.). On his arrival, Severus found that Anthimus, who had just obtained the patriarchate of Constantinople, A. D. 535, was a Monophysite, and he prevailed on him to avow his sentiments. Timotheus of Alexandria was a Monophysite also, and the avowal of that obnoxious heresy by the heads of the church, naturally excited the alarm of the orthodox party. Anthimus and Timotheus were both deposed; and in the councils of Constantinople and Jerusalem (A. D. 536), and in an imperial edict, Severus was again anathematized ; his writings also were ordered to be burned. These decisive measures secured the predominanc
class the first part, or first four books (prw=ta), of the Digest, some fragments of which are preserved in the scholia on the Basilica : this explanation completed the first year's course of study. We also infer from the same scholia that, in A. D. 535, Theophilus explained to his class the second part, or the seven books (De Judiciis), for the same scholia have preserved passages from his commentary on this part of the Digest. There are also fragments of his commentary on the third division (De Rebus). His labours, apparently, did not extend beyond A. D. 535, and he may have died in A. D. 536, as it is conjectured. Thalelaeus, one of his colleagues, in the school of Constantinople, speaks of him as dead; and probably Thalelaeus wrote about A. D. 537. *)Institou=ta *Qeofi/lou *)Antike/nswros (Instituta Theophili Antecensoris) The title of the paraphrase of Theophilus is *)Institou=ta *Qeofi/lou *)Antike/nswros, Instituta Theophili Antecensoris. It became the text for the Insti