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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Agape'tus, St. (search)
. Liberati, ap. Mansi, Concilia, vol. ix. p. 695.) As to this last object he could make no impression on the emperor, but he succeeded in persuading him to depose Anthimus, and when Mennas was chosen to succeed him, Agapetus laid his own hands upon him. The Council and the Synodal (interpreted into Greek) sent by Agapetus relating to these affairs may be found ap. Mansi, vol. viii. pp. 869, 921. Complaints were sent him from various quarters against the Monophysite Acephali; but he died suddenly A. D. 536, April 22, and they were read in a Council held on 2nd May, by Mennas. (Mansi, ibid. p. 874.) There are two letters from St. Agapetus to Justinian in reply to a letter from the emperor, in the latter of which he refuses to acknowledge the Orders of the Arians; and there are two others: 1. To the Bishops of Africa, on the same subject; 2. To Reparatus, Bishop of Carthage, in answer to a letter of congratulation on his elevation to the Pontificate. (Mansi, Concilia, viii. pp. 846-850.)
A'nthimus (*)Anqi/mos), bishop of Trapezus in Pontus, was made patriarch of Constantinople by the influence of the empress Theodora (A. D. 535), and about the same time was drawn over to the Eutychian heresy by Severus. Soon after his election to the patriarchate, Agapetus, the bishop of Rome, came to Constantinople, and obtained from the emperor Justinian a sentence of deposition against Anthimus, which was confirmed by a synod held at Constantinople under Mennas, the successor of Anthimus. (A. D. 536; Novell. 42; Mansi, Nova Collect. Concil. viii. pp. 821, 869, 1149-1158; Labbe, v.; AGAPETUS.) Some fragments of the debate between Anthimus and Agapetus in the presence of Justinian are preserved in the Acts of the Councils. [P.
1523), was received at Rome on the 7th of April, A. D. 520, which must therefore have been the year of his election. He occupied the see from A. D. 520 till his death in A. D. 535. Theophanes places his death in June, A. D. 529, Alex. comput. = A. D. 536 of the common era, after a patriarchate of sixteen years and three months; but Pagi (Critic. in Baronii Annales ad ann. 535, No. lviii.) shortens this calculation by a year. Epiphanius was one of the saints of the Greek calendar, and is mention 520, during the continuance of which he was elected tothe patriarchate), condemning and anathematizing for heresy Severus, patriarch of Antioch, Petrus or Peter, bishop of Apamea, and Zoaras, was read at a subsequent council of Constantinople, A. D. 536, under Menas or Mennas, successor of Anthimius, and appears in Labbe's Concilia, vol. v. col. 251, seq. Some laws and constitutions of Justinian are addressed to Epiphanius. (Justin. Cod. 1. tit. 3. s. 42; de Episcopis et Cleris ; Novellae, 3,
Comp. also his Hist. Eccles. 3.34.) Photius says (Biblioth. Cod. 29), according to the present text, that he was of a celebrated city (po/lews de\ e)pifanou=s) of Coele-Syria; but the text is probably corrupt. Nicephorus Callisti (Hist. Eccles. 1.1, 16.31) twice cites him as o( e)pifanh/s, "the illustrious;" but this is probably an error, either in the transcription of Nicephorus or in that of his authorities. The birth of Evagrius is fixed by data furnished in his own writings in or about A. D. 536. (Evagr. Hist. Eccles. 4.29, 6.24.) He was sent to school before or when he was four years old, for he was a schoolboy when he was taken by his parents to the neighbouring city of Apameia to see the exhibition of "the life-giving wood of the Cross," during the alarm caused by the capture of Antioch by Chosroes or Khosru I., king of Persia, A. D. 540. Two years afterwards (A. D. 542), he was near dying from a pestilential disorder which then first visited the Byzantine empire, and which con
ssion to return to Constantinople (Evagrius. l.c.). On his arrival, Severus found that Anthimus, who had just obtained the patriarchate of Constantinople, A. D. 535, was a Monophysite, and he prevailed on him to avow his sentiments. Timotheus of Alexandria was a Monophysite also, and the avowal of that obnoxious heresy by the heads of the church, naturally excited the alarm of the orthodox party. Anthimus and Timotheus were both deposed; and in the councils of Constantinople and Jerusalem (A. D. 536), and in an imperial edict, Severus was again anathematized ; his writings also were ordered to be burned. These decisive measures secured the predominance of the orthodox : and Evagrius boasts that the church remained from thenceforth united and pure. But this result was obtained by the separation of Monophysites, and the formation of the great Jacobite schismatical churches of Egypt and the East, by whom Severus has been ever regarded as, to his death, legitimate patriarch of Antioch. So
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Seve'rus or Seve'rus Bar (search)
ssion to return to Constantinople (Evagrius. l.c.). On his arrival, Severus found that Anthimus, who had just obtained the patriarchate of Constantinople, A. D. 535, was a Monophysite, and he prevailed on him to avow his sentiments. Timotheus of Alexandria was a Monophysite also, and the avowal of that obnoxious heresy by the heads of the church, naturally excited the alarm of the orthodox party. Anthimus and Timotheus were both deposed; and in the councils of Constantinople and Jerusalem (A. D. 536), and in an imperial edict, Severus was again anathematized ; his writings also were ordered to be burned. These decisive measures secured the predominance of the orthodox : and Evagrius boasts that the church remained from thenceforth united and pure. But this result was obtained by the separation of Monophysites, and the formation of the great Jacobite schismatical churches of Egypt and the East, by whom Severus has been ever regarded as, to his death, legitimate patriarch of Antioch. So
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Theodo'rus ASCIDAS (search)
Theodo'rus ASCIDAS 12. ASCIDAS (o( *)Askida=s), a Cappadocian, first a monk of the convent of Nova Laura in Palestine, and afterwards archbishop of Caesaraeia in Cappadocia in the reign of Justinian I. He was probably appointed to his see in A. D. 536, or soon after, but resided little in his diocese, being much at court, where he enjoyed the favour and confidence of the emperor, and was much employed by him. He was also in favour with the empress Theodora, probably from his secretly holding the opinions of the Acephali. When the revival of the doctrines of Origen [ORIGENES] in the monasteries of Palestine, and especially in that monastery called Nova Laura, began to excite attention, Eustochius, patriarch of Jerusalem, a decided Anti-Origenist expelled from the convent of Nova Laura those of the monks who were known as Origenists, and compelled them, by his persecution, to fly to distant parts. In their dispersion, however, they diffused their views more widely, and their cause wa
erved in the scholia on the Basilica : this explanation completed the first year's course of study. We also infer from the same scholia that, in A. D. 535, Theophilus explained to his class the second part, or the seven books (De Judiciis), for the same scholia have preserved passages from his commentary on this part of the Digest. There are also fragments of his commentary on the third division (De Rebus). His labours, apparently, did not extend beyond A. D. 535, and he may have died in A. D. 536, as it is conjectured. Thalelaeus, one of his colleagues, in the school of Constantinople, speaks of him as dead; and probably Thalelaeus wrote about A. D. 537. *)Institou=ta *Qeofi/lou *)Antike/nswros (Instituta Theophili Antecensoris) The title of the paraphrase of Theophilus is *)Institou=ta *Qeofi/lou *)Antike/nswros, Instituta Theophili Antecensoris. It became the text for the Institutes in the East, where the Latin language was little known, and entirely displaced the Latin text.
Zacharias 2. The preceding should no doubt be distinguished from Zacharias surnamed Scholasticus. The latter studied philosophy at Alexandria, and jutrisprudence at Berytus. After some time he was made bishop of Mytilene in Lesbos, and while in this office was present at the council held at Constantinople in A. D. 536, in the Acta of which he is several times mentioned. Works The Ammonius, an anti-platonic dialogue There is still extant a work by Zacharias. entitled *)Ammw/nios. It professed to be a dialogue held with a disciple of Ammonius, and to contain the substance of a discussion held at Alexandria with Ammonius himself and one Gessius, a physician. The design of the work is to refute the favourite Platonic doctrine of the eternity of the universe. (*(/Oti ou) sunai+/dios tw=| qew=| o( ko/smos, a)lla\ dhmiou/rghma au)tou= tugxa/nei), and the occasion which led to its composition was the endeavour of a disciple of Ammonius who had come to Berytus to spread that doctrine,