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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 17 17 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 58 AD or search for 58 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, FICUS NAVIA (search)
omulus and Remus, and to have been miraculously transported to the Comitium by the power of the augur Navius (Plin. NH xv. 77; Tac. Ann. xiii. 58). It was surrounded by a bronze grating (Conon, Narr. 48: e)rineo\s i(era/, and thereby marked a spot that had been struck by lightning (Plin. loc. cit.: sacra fulguribus ibi conditis). It was regarded as a symbol of Rome's power, and any sign of withering as an unfavourable omen which must be averted by the priests (Plin. loc. cit.; Fest. 169). This happened in 58 A.D., according to Tacitus (loc. cit.), who calls the tree ruminalis arbor (see below), and says that it had sheltered the twins 840 years before. The probable explanation of this tree on the Comitium is, that it had grown in a spot which had been struck by lightning and therefore was left unpaved and sacred; and, as this spot was close to the statue of Navius, the legend had developed that the augur had brought it over from the Lupercal (Jord. i. 2. 264, 356-7 ; RE vi. 2147-8).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
cer (?), 100. 44-45Cippi of Aqua Virgo, 29. 46Restores Aqua Virgo, 29, 35. 47Aqua Claudia completed (?), 22. 49Pomerium extended to include Aventine, 66, 393. 51-52Arch of Claudius carrying Aqua Virgo over the Via Lata, 29, 35. 52Anio Novus completed, 11. Aqua Claudia dedicated, 22. Porta Praenestina (Maggiore), 412. 54-68Reign of Nero: before 64 A.D. Nero builds Domus Transitoria, 194 ff.; removes Euripus in Circus Maximus, 116, 203; Agrippina begins Temple of Claudius, 120. 58Ficus Navia withers, 208. 58-62Arch of Nero on Capitol, 41. 59Macellum Magnum, 323. 62Trophies of Nero, 542. Gymnasium of Nero built and burnt in the same year, 249. 62 or 64Thermae Neronianae, 531. 63Temple of Fecunditas vowed (probably not built), 206. 64The great fire of Nero: destroys Circus Maximus, 117: Ara Maxima Herculis, 253: Temple of Luna, 320: of Vesta, 558: Amphitheatre of Statilius Taurus, 11. After the fire Nero builds Domus Aurea, 166 ff., 195: Temple of F