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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 31 31 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 06, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background, Introduction, Chapter 1 (search)
of letters who, without much dramatic sympathy or aptitude, with no knowledge of stage requirements, and little prospect of getting their pieces performed, felt called upon honoris causâ to write dramas, which one of the most distinguished and successful among them was candid enough to entitle not plays but treatises. It is worth while to have a clear idea of the Octavia from which in right line this illustrious and forgotten progeny proceeded. The date of the action is supposed to be 62 A.D. when Nero, who had for some time wished to wed his mistress, Poppaea Sabina, and had murdered his mother, partly on account of her opposition, divorced his virtuous wife, his step-sister Octavia, and exiled her to Pandataria, where shortly afterwards he had her put to death. The fact that Seneca is one of the persons in the piece, and that there are anticipatory references to Nero's death, which followed Seneca's compulsory suicide only after an interval of three years, sufficiently dispose
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, GYMNASIUM NERONIS (search)
GYMNASIUM NERONIS a building for gymnastic purposes, dedicated by Nero in 62 A.D. (Suet. Nero 12: dedicatisque thermis atque gymnasio senatui quoque et equiti oleum praebuit; Tac. Ann. xiv. 47: gymnasium eo anno dedicatum a Nerone praebitumque oleum equiti ac senatui Graeca facilitate), or in 60 after the establishment of the Neronia (Cass. Dio lxi. 21. I:kai\ e)p) au)tw=| kai\ to\ gumna/sion w)|kodo/mhsev e)laio/on tw e)n th=| kaqierw/sei au)tou= kai\ toi=s bouleutai=s kai\ toi=s I(ppeu=si proi=ka e)/neime). Later in 62 the gymnasium was burned and a bronze statue of Nero melted (Tac. Ann. xv. 22). Philostratus (vit. Apoll. iv. 42) says that it was one of the most wonderful buildings in the city. There are no other references to this gymnasium, but it would be natural to suppose that it was near or connected with the THERMAE (q.v.), which Nero is said to have dedicated at the same time (Suet. loc. cit.). The language of Philostratus seems to make no distinction between gumna/si
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE NERONIANAE (search)
THERMAE NERONIANAE the second public bathing establishment in Rome, built by Nero near the Pantheon (Suet. Nero 12; Aur. Vict. Ep. 5; Eutrop. vii. 15). According to the Chronica (Hier. a. Abr. 2079; Cassiod. Chron. min. ii. 138) they were erected in 64 A.D., but if they are to be identified with Nero's GYMNASIUM (q.v.), which was built in 62, their construction also must be assigned to that year (HJ 590). They were among the notable monuments of the city (Mart. ii. 48. 8; iii. 25. 4; vii. 34. 5, 9; Philostr. vit. Apoll. iv. 42; Stat. Silv. i. 5. 62), and evidently became a very popular resort (for incidental references, Mart. ii. 14. 13; xii. 83. 5; CIL vi. 8676, 9797, 5 =AL 29. 5). A hypocaust was found in the courtyard of Palazzo Madama in 1871 with the brick-stamps CIL xv. 481 (123 A.D.) ; and in 1907 in another hypocaust were found ib. 164 (Severus), 364 (Hadrian), 371 b (Severus), 404 (Severus) on the site of S. Salvatore in Thermis. Pipes were found in the walls of the time o
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TROPAEA NERONIS (search)
TROPAEA NERONIS trophies erected by Nero in 62 A.D., on the Capitol to commemorate victories over the Parthians (Tac. Ann. xv. 18; Jord. i. 2. 117, 29).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
of Nero: before 64 A.D. Nero builds Domus Transitoria, 194 ff.; removes Euripus in Circus Maximus, 116, 203; Agrippina begins Temple of Claudius, 120. 58Ficus Navia withers, 208. 58-62Arch of Nero on Capitol, 41. 59Macellum Magnum, 323. 62Trophies of Nero, 542. Gymnasium of Nero built and burnt in the same year, 249. 62 or 64Thermae Neronianae, 531. 63Temple of Fecunditas vowed (probably not built), 206. 64The great fire of Nero: destroys Circus Maximus, 117: Ara Maxima Hercul62 or 64Thermae Neronianae, 531. 63Temple of Fecunditas vowed (probably not built), 206. 64The great fire of Nero: destroys Circus Maximus, 117: Ara Maxima Herculis, 253: Temple of Luna, 320: of Vesta, 558: Amphitheatre of Statilius Taurus, 11. After the fire Nero builds Domus Aurea, 166 ff., 195: Temple of Fortuna Seiani in Domus Aurea, 219: Colossus of Nero, 130: Porticus on the Sacred Way, 166, 423: Sacra Via, 458; Porticus Miliaria, 424; destroys or transforms Temple of Claudius, 120; rebuilds Circus Maximus, 117; builds a wooden amphitheatre, 1; rebuilds House of the Vestals, 59; Campus Neronis, 94; ext
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Africa'nus, T. Se'xtius a Roman of noble rank, was deterred by Agrippina from marrying Silana. In A. D. 62, he took the census in the provinces of Gaul, together with Q. Volusius and Trebellius Maximus. (Tac. Ann. 13.19, 14.46.) His name occurs in a fragment of the Fratres Arvales. (Gruter, p. 119.) There was a T. Sextius Africanus consul with Trajan in A. D. 112, who was probably a descendant of the one mentioned above.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Vologeses I. (search)
s to Corbulo to solicit a truce, that he might despatch an embassy to Rome concerning the terms of peace. This was granted; but as no satisfactory answer was obtained from Nero, Vologeses invaded Armenia, where he gained considerable advantages over Caesenninus Paetus, and at length besieged him in his winter-quarters. Paetus, alarmed at his situation, agreed with Vologeses, that Armenia should be surrendered to the Romans, and that he should be allowed to retire in safety from the country, A. D. 62. Shortly after this, Vologeses sent another embassy to Rome; and Nero agreed to surrender Armenia to Tiridates, provided the latter would come to Rome and receive it as a gift from the Roman emperor. Peace was made on these conditions; and Tiridates repaired to Rome, A. D. 63, where he was received with extraordinary splendour, and obtained from Nero the Armenian crown. (Tac. Ann. 15.1-18, 25-31; D. C. 62.20-23, 63.1-7.) In the struggle for the empire after Nero's death, Vologeses sent am
igranes, who reigned at Edessa, and whose descendants became masters of Armenia Magna after the extinction of the Arsacidae in that country with the death of Tiridates I., who was established on the throne by Nero, and who died most probably in A. D. 62. The Armenian historians have treated with particular attention the history of the younger branch; they speak but little about the earlier transactions with Rome; and they are almost silent with regard to those kings, the offspring of the kings . Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second or younger Branch, The second or younger branch, at first at Edessa, and sometimes identical with the " Reges Osrhoenenses," afterwards in Armenia Magna. B
riage, and she then became the wife of her uncle, Herod, king of Chalcis, by whom she had two sons. (J. AJ 18.5.4, 19.5.1, 9.1, 20.5.2, 7.3; Bell. Jud. 2.2.6.) After the death of Herod, A. D. 48, Berenice, then 20 years old, lived for a considerable time with her brother, and not without suspicion of an incestuous commerce with him, to avoid the scandal of which she induced Polemon, king of Cilicia, to marry her; but she soon deserted him and returned to Agrippa, with whom she was living in A. D. 62, when St. Paul defended himself before him at Caesareia. (J. AJ 20.7.3; Juv. 6.156; Acts, xxv. xxvi.) About A. D. 65, we hear of her being at Jerusalem (whither she had gone for the performance of a vow), and intereding for the Jews with Gessius Florus, at the risk of her life, during his cruel massacre of them. (Joseph. Beil. Jud. 2.15.1.) Together with her brother. she endeavoured to divert her countrymen from their purpose of rebellion (Bell. Jud. 2.16.5); and having joined the Romans w
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
of his profession opposed a law by which advocates were to be forbidden to accept anyfees from their clients. In A. D. 56 he obtained Cilicia as his province, and there he acted with the same avarice and impudence as he had done before at Rome. In the year following, the Cilicians accused him of extortion, and he was condemned, in consequence of which he lost his senatorial rank. But this he afterwards received back, through the mediation of Tigellinus, his father-in-law; and shortly after, A. D. 62, he accused the praetor Antistius Sosianus of high treason. In A. D. 66, Annaeus Mela, the brother of the philosopher Seneca, and father of the poet Annaeus Lucan, left a large legacy to Tigellinus and Cossutianus Capito, the latter of whom came forward in the same year as the accuser of Thrasea Paetus, for Thrasea had formerly supported the cause of the Cilicians against him, and had been instrumental in bringing about his condemnation. Capito was rewarded by Nero for this base act with an
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