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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 4 4 Browse Search
The Venerable Bede, Historiam ecclesiasticam gentis Anglorum (ed. Charles Plummer) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 633 AD or search for 633 AD in all documents.

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his youth devoted to study and to religious exercises, labouring at the same time with zeal and success in the conversion of the Arian Visigoths. Upon the death of Leander, in A. D. 600 or 601, he succeeded to his episcopal charge. One of his first acts was to establish a college for the education of youth; soon after he repaired to Rome for the purpose of holding personal communication with the great Gregory, in 616 (or 617), he presided at the second council of Sevilla, and in December, A. D. 633, at the great council of Toledo, manifesting at all times the most eager anxiety for the extension of the orthodox faith, and for the maintenance of order and strict discipline among the clergy. He died in the church of St. Vincentius on the 4th of April, A. D. 636. The esteem in which he was held by his contemporaries and immediate successors is sufficiently attested by the tribute to his memory in the Acts of the eighth council of Toledo, held fourteen years after his death : " Nostri se
his youth devoted to study and to religious exercises, labouring at the same time with zeal and success in the conversion of the Arian Visigoths. Upon the death of Leander, in A. D. 600 or 601, he succeeded to his episcopal charge. One of his first acts was to establish a college for the education of youth; soon after he repaired to Rome for the purpose of holding personal communication with the great Gregory, in 616 (or 617), he presided at the second council of Sevilla, and in December, A. D. 633, at the great council of Toledo, manifesting at all times the most eager anxiety for the extension of the orthodox faith, and for the maintenance of order and strict discipline among the clergy. He died in the church of St. Vincentius on the 4th of April, A. D. 636. The esteem in which he was held by his contemporaries and immediate successors is sufficiently attested by the tribute to his memory in the Acts of the eighth council of Toledo, held fourteen years after his death : " Nostri se
hat of Jerome and Sophronius. Further Information Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. ix. pp. 158-161 ; Cave, Script. Eccles. Hist. Litt. s. a., 390, p. 285, ed. Basil.; Vossius, de Hist. Graec. p. 306, ed. Westermann. Sophro'nius 2. Patriarch of Jerusalem, A. D. 629-638, was a native of Damascus, and at first a sophist, afterwards a monk, and in A. D. 629 he succeeded Modestus as patriarch of Jerusalem. He distinguished himself as a defender of orthodoxy ; and at the Council of Alexandria, in A. D. 633, he openly charged Cyrus with introducing heresy into the church under pretence of peace, and renounced all communion with him. When Jerusalem was taken by Omar, in A. D. 636, he obtained for the Christians the free exercise of their worship. He died, according to some, in the same year; according to others, two years later, in A. D. 638. Works There are extant in MS. numerous epistles, discourses, commentaries, and other treatises, by Sophronius, full lists of which are given by Fabric
Sophro'nius 2. Patriarch of Jerusalem, A. D. 629-638, was a native of Damascus, and at first a sophist, afterwards a monk, and in A. D. 629 he succeeded Modestus as patriarch of Jerusalem. He distinguished himself as a defender of orthodoxy ; and at the Council of Alexandria, in A. D. 633, he openly charged Cyrus with introducing heresy into the church under pretence of peace, and renounced all communion with him. When Jerusalem was taken by Omar, in A. D. 636, he obtained for the Christians the free exercise of their worship. He died, according to some, in the same year; according to others, two years later, in A. D. 638. Works There are extant in MS. numerous epistles, discourses, commentaries, and other treatises, by Sophronius, full lists of which are given by Fabricius and Cave. He also wrote hymns and other poems. An Anacreontic poem by him, on the subject of Simeon taking Christ into his arms, was published by Leo Allatius, in his Diatriba de Simeonibus, pp. 5, foll. Three