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to entreat that their country might be annexed to Syria and ruled by Roman governors. The will of Herod was, however, ratified in its main points by Augustus, and in the division of the kingdom Archelaus received Judaea, Samaria, and Idumaea, with the title of Ethnarch, and a promise of that of king should he be found to deserve it. (Ant. 17.9, 11; Bell. Jatd. 2.2, 6; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 1.9; comp. Luke, 19.12-27.) On his return from Rome he set the Jewish law at defiance by his marriage with Glaphyra (daughter of Archelaus, king of Cappadocia), the widow of his brother Alexander, by whom she had children living (Levit. 18.16, 20.21; Dent. 25.5); and, his general government being most tyrannical, he was again accused before Augustus by the Jews in the 10th year of his reign (A. D. 7), and, as he was unable to clear himself from their charges, he was banished to Vienna in G(aul, where he died. (Ant. 17.13; Bell. Jitd. 2.7.3; Strab. xvi. p.765; D. C. 4.27; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 1.9.) [E.E]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
s even bite her maids, and used to quarrel with her husband " more than Xantippe with Socrates." He received his first instruction from his father, and in his fifteenth year, A. D. 144-5, began to learn logic and to study philosophy under a pupil of Philopator the Stoic, under Caius the Platonist, (or, more probably, one of his pupils,) under a pupil of Aspasius the Peripatetic, and also under an Epicurean. (De Dignos. et Cur. An. Morb. 100.8. vol. v. p. 41.) In his seventeenth year, A. D. 146-7, his father, who had hitherto destined him to be a philosopher, altered his intentions, and, in consequence of a dream, chose for him the profession of Medicine. (De Meth. Med. 9.4. vol. x. p. 609; Comment. in Hippocr. " De Humor." 2.2. vol. xvi. p. 223; De Ord. Libr. suor. vol. xix. p. 59.) No expense was spared in his education, and the names of several of his medical tutors have been preserved. His first tutors were probably Aeschrion (De Simpl. Medic. Temper. ac Facult. 11.1.34. vol. xii.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
tions and coins he is styled Germanicus Caesar, Ti. Aug. F. Divi Aug. N.; and in history the relationships which he acquired by adoption are often spoken of in place of the natural relationships of blood and birth. Upon his adoption into the Julia gens, whatever may have been his formal legal designation, he did not lose the title Germanicus, though his brother Claudius, as having now become the sole legal representative of his father, chose also to assume that cognomen. (Suet. Cl. 2.) In A. D. 7, five years before the legal age (Suet. Cal. 1 ), he obtained the quaestorship; and in the same year was sent to assist Tiberius in the war against the Pannonians and Dalmatians. (D. C. 55.31). After a distinguished commencement of his military career, he returned to Rome in A. D. 10, to announce in person the victorious termination of the war, whereupon he was honoured with triumphal insignia (without an actual triumph), and the rank (not the actual office) of praetor, with permission to b
duus chose this remote seat of empire from dread of their arms. But policy rather than fear probably directed his choice, for if Rome was to be assailed, leisure and security for many years were needful to prepare the Germans for the assault. In A. D. 7, however, his designs, or the strength of the Marcomannic kingdom aroused the jealousy of Augustus. The existence of a free and powerful state was a dangerous spectacle for the subjects of Rome; the disunion of the Teutonic tribes was the securif his life, eighteen years, at Ravenna. His name was sometimes employed to keep the Suevians in awe, but Tiberius warily guarded a captive whom, before the senate, he compared to Pyrrhus and Antiochus. By his inactivity during the Pannonian war, A. D. 7-9, Maroboduus let slip the opportunity of raising Germany against Rome, and his resignation to an obscure and protracted life in exile lost him the esteem of his own countrymen. He died at the age of 53 years, A. D. 35. (Strab. vii. p.290; Tac.
Metellus 29. Q. Caecilius Metellus Creticus, consul A. D. 7 with A. Licinius Nerva, was probably grandson of No. 23, and son of No. 26, if the latter ever existed. (D. C. 55.30; Fasti.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Nerva, Lici'nius 7. A. Licinius Nerva Silianus, was adopted by some Licinius Nerva, as the name Silianus shows, out of the Silia gens. He was the son of P. Silius (Vell. 2.116), a distinguished commander under Augustus, and consul, B. C. 20. with M. Appuleius. Silianus was consul, A. D. 7, but he is called Licinius Silanus in the text of Dio Cassius (55.30). P. Silius, the consul of B. C. 20, appears in the Fasti Consulares as P. Silius Nerva, whence it appears that the cognomen Nerva belonged to the Silii. [SILIUS.] The authorities for the Licinii Nervae are collected by Drumann, Geschichte Roms, vol. iv. p. 196, &c. [G.L]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
the Biographie Universelle. He is of opinion that the poet was the victim of a coup d'etat, and that his offence was his having been the political partizan of Posthumus Agrippa; which prompted Livia and Tiberius, whose influence over the senile Augustus was then complete, to procure his banishment. This solution is founded on the assumed coincidence of time in the exiles of Agrippa and Ovid. But the fact is that the former was banished, at least a year before the latter, namely some time in A. D. 7 (D. C. 4.32; Vell. 2.112), whereas Ovid did not leave Rome till December A. D. 8. Nor can Ovid's expressions concerning the cause of his disgrace be at all reconciled with Villenave's supposition. The coincidence of his banishment, however, with that of the younger Julia, who, as we learn from Tacitus (Tac. Ann. 4.71) died in A. D. 28, after twenty years' exile, is a remarkable fact, and leads very strongly to the inference that his fate was in some way connected with hers. This opinion has
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
f the soldiers and tribune of the camp. For the next eight years Paterculus served under Tiberius, either as praefectus or legatus, in the various campaigns of the latter in Germany, Pannonia, and Dalmatia, and, by his activity and ability, gained the favour of the future emperor. He was accordingly promoted to the quaestorship, and in A. D. 6, when he was quaestor elect, he conducted to Tiberius the forces which had been lately levied in the city. In his quaestorship in the following year, A. D. 7, he was excused from drawing lots for a province, and continued to serve as legatus under Tiberius. He accompanied his commander on his return to Rome in A. D. 12, and mentions with pride that he and his brother Magius Celer took a prominent part in the triumphal procession of Tiberius, and were decorated with military honours. Two years afterwards, A. D. 14, the names of Velfices leius and his brother were put down by Augustus for the praetorship; but as that emperor died before the comiti
Phili'stion (*Filisti/wn) of Nicaea or Magnesia, a mimnographer, who flourished in the time of Augustus, about A. D. 7 (Hieron. in Euseb. Chron. Ol. 196. 3). Works Mimes He was an actor, as well as a writer of mimes, and is said, in an epigram preserved in the Greek Anthology, to have died of excessive laughter (Jacobs, Anth. Graec. vol. iv. p. 230; Anth. Pal. vol. ii. p. 349). He is frequently mentioned by the Greek writers of the second century and downwards. Suidas, who, by some extrah improved state, by J. Rutgersius, in his Var. Lect. vol. iv. p. 355-367, with the notes of Heinsius. Boissonade has published the work, from a Paris MS., in his Anecdota, vol. i. p. 146-150, whence Meineke has transferred it into his Fragmenta Comicorum Graecorum, vol. iv. pp. 335-339. Further Information Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. ii. p. 480; Meineke, Menand. et Philem. Reliq. Praef. p. vii. &c.; Clinton, F. H. sub ann. A. D. 7; Bernhardy, Geschichte der Griech. Litt. vol. ii. p. 924.[P.