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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 741 AD or search for 741 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Artavasde or Artabasdus (*)Arta/basdos) (search)
Artavasde or Artabasdus (*)Arta/basdos) Emperor of Constantinople, was probably descended from a noble Armenian family. During the reign of Constantine V. Copronymus (A. D. 741-775), he was appointed Curopalatus, and married Anna, a daughter of this emperor. Constantine, as his nick-name Caballinus indicates, would havc made an excellent groom, but was a bad emperor; excited by fanaticism, he was active in the destruction of images in the churches, and thus acquired the name of the new Mohammed. Artavasdes, an adherent of the worship of images, profited from the discontent of the people against Constantine, and during a campaign of the emperor against the Arabs, prepared a revolt in Phrygia. Constantine, doubtful of his fidelity, demanded the sons of Artavasdes as hostages for the good conduct of their father, who refused to give them up, and suddenly surprised his master at the head of an army. Constantine was defeated, and fled into Phrygia Pacotiana, where he assembled his troops.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Constanti'nus Copro'nymus (search)
Constanti'nus V. or Constanti'nus Copro'nymus surnamed COPRO'NYMUS (o( *Koprw/numos), because he polluted the baptismal font at the time of his baptism, emperor of the East, A. D. 741-775, was the only son of the emperor Leo III. Isaurus. He was born in 719, and succeeded his father in 741. The unfortunate commencement of his reign is related in the life of the emperor ARTAVASDES, p. 370b. The downfall of this usurper in 743 and the complete success of Constantine caused much grief to pope Zacharias, who had recognized Artavasdes because he protected the worship of images, while Constantine was an iconoclast, at whose instigation a council held at Constantinople in 754 condemned the worship of images throughout the whole Eastern empire. Constantine was most cruel in his proceedings against the orthodox : he anathematized Joannes Damascenus and put to death Constantine, the patriarch of Constantinople, St. Stephanus, and many other fathers who had declared for the images. In 751 Eutyc