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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 5 (search)
the present work, as thinking it will appear to all the Greeks That is, all the Gentiles, both Greeks and Romans. worthy of their study; for it will contain all our antiquities, and the constitution of our government, as interpreted out of the Hebrew Scriptures. And indeed I did formerly intend, when I wrote of the war, We may seasonably note here, that Josephus wrote his Seven Books of the Jewish War long before he wrote these his Antiquities. Those books of the War were published about A.D. 75, and these Antiquities, A. D. 93, about eighteen years later. to explain who the Jews originally were, - what fortunes they had been subject to, - and by what legislature they had been instructed in piety, and the exercise of other virtues, - what wars also they had made in remote ages, till they were unwillingly engaged in this last with the Romans: but because this work would take up a great compass, I separated it into a set treatise by itself, with a beginning of its own, and its own concl
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 1 (search)
I have already observed more than once, that this History of the Jewish War was Josephus's first work, and published about A.D. 75, when he was but thirty-eight years of age; and that when he wrote it, he was not thoroughly acquainted with several circumstances of history from the days of Antiochus Epiphanes, with which it begins, till near his own times, contained in the first and former part of the second book, and so committed many involuntary errors therein. That he published his Antiquities eighteen years afterward, in the thirteenth year of Domitian, A.D. 93, when he was much more completely acquainted with those ancient times, and after he had perused those most authentic histories, the First Book of Maccabees, and the Chronicles of the Priesthood of John Hyrcanus, etc. That accordingly he then reviewed those parts of this work, and gave the public a more faithful, complete, and accurate account of the facts therein related; and honestly corrected the errors he bad before run in
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PAX, TEMPLUM (search)
PAX, TEMPLUM * (aedes, Vict.;*ei)rh/nhs new/s, Procop.; *ei)rhnai=on, Cass. Dio lxxii.;te/menos *ei)rh/nhs , other Greek writers): the temple of Peace which was begun by Vespasian after the capture of Jerusalem in 71 A.D., and dedicated in 75 (Suet. Vesp. 9; Joseph. b. Iud. vii. 5. 7 (158) ; Cass. Dio lxv. 15. ; Aur. Vict. Caes. 9. 7; Ep. 9. 8). It stood in the middle of the forum Pacis, north of the basilica Aemilia (Mart. i. 2. 8), probably at the junction of the modern Vie Alessandrina and dei Pozzi. Statius seems to ascribe the completion of this temple to Domitian (Silv. iv. 3. 17; cf. iv. I. 13), but this emperor's claim may have had little foundation (cf. Suet. Dom. 5). Within the temple, or attached closely to it, was a library, bibliotheca Pacis (Gell. v. 21. 9; xvi. 8. 2; Boyd, 16-17, 36-37). In it were placed many of the treasures brought by Vespasian from Jerusalem, as well as famous works of Greek artists (Joseph. b. Iud. vii. 5. 7; Plin. NH xii. 94; xxxiv. 84; xxxv.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, VINEA PUBLICA (search)
VINEA PUBLICA apparently a public vineyard or park, known only from the inscription on a terminal cippus of 75 A.D. (CIL vi. 933; cf. 31208:Imp. Caesar Vespasianus Aug.... locum viniae publicae occupatum a privatis per collegium pontificum restituit). This was found outside the Aurelian wall between the 'porta Ardeatina' and the porta Appia (BC 1882, 155), and probably the vinea lay south of the Bastione del Sangallo, within the limits of Region XII, if this region ever extended beyond the line of the wall.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
85, and Balineum Bolani, 68. 69-79Reign of Vespasian: restores Capitoline Temple, 300; rebuilds Temple of Claudius, 120; restores Temple of Honos and Virtus, 259: of Juppiter Conservator, 292; begins destruction of Domus Aurea, 171; changes the head of the Colossus of Nero, 130; restores scaena of the Theatre of Marcellus, 513; begins the Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6; terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 71Aqueducts restored, 22, 413, 417. 75Extends Pomerium, 395. Forum and Temple of Peace begun and dedicated in 75 A.D., 386. 79(before). Temple of Augustus burnt, 62, 84. 79-81 Reign of Titus: Titus begins Temple of Vespasian, 556: and Thermae, 533. 79Titus restores Aqua Marcia, 25, 417. 80Inaugural games in Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6. Great fire of Titus: destroys Capitoline Temple, 300; Porticus of Octavia, 427; and its library, 85; Temple of Isis, 284; Theatrum of Balbus, 513; scaena of Pompey's Thea
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Vologeses I. (search)
him with 40,000 Parthians. This offer was declined by Vespasian, but he bade Vologeses send ambassadors to the senate, and he secured peace to him. (Tac. Hist. 4.51.) Vologeses afterwards sent an embassy to Titus, as he was returning from the conquest of Jerusalem, to congratulate him on his success, and present him with a golden crown; and shortly afterwards (A. D. 72), he sent another embassy to Vespasian to intercede on behalf of Antiochus, the deposed king of Commagene. (Joseph. B. J. 7.5.2, 7.3; comp. D. C. 66.11; Suet. Nero 57.) In A. D. 75, Vologeses sent again to Vespasian, to beg him to assist the Parthians against the Alani, who were then at war with them; but Vespasian declined to do so, on the plea that it did not become him to meddle in other people's affairs. (D. C. 66.15; Suet. Dom. 2; Joseph. B. J. 7.7.4.) Vologeses founded on the Euphrates, a little to the south of Babylon, the town of Vologesocerta. (Plin. Nat. 6.30.) he seems to have lived till the reign of Domitian.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
are as follows:-- 1. The History of the Jewish War (peri\ tou= *)Ioudai+kou= pole/mou h)\ *)Ioudai+kh=s i(stori/as peri/ a(lw/sews) The History of the Jewish War (peri\ tou= *)Ioudai+kou= pole/mou h)\ *)Ioudai+kh=s i(stori/as peri/ a(lw/sews), in seven books. Josephus tells us that he wrote it first in his own language, and then translated it into Greek, for the information of European readers (Prooem. ad Bell. Jud. § 1). The Hebrew copy is no longer extant. The Greek was published about A. D. 75, under the patronage and with the especial recommendation of Titus. Agrippa II. also, in no fewer than sixty-two letters to Josephus, bore testimony to the care and fidelity displayed in it. It was admitted into the Palatine library, and its author was honoured with a statue at Rome. It commences with the capture of Jerusalem by Antiochus Epiphanes in B. C. 170, runs rapidly over the events before Josephus's own time, and gives a detailed account of the fatal war with Rome. (Jos. Vit. 65; E