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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 78 AD or search for 78 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
-houses and temples. He established a system of education for the sons of the British chiefs, amongst whom at last the Roman language was spoken, and the Roman toga worn as a fashionable dress. He was full seven years in Britain, from the year A. D. 78 to A. D. 84. The last conquest of his predecessor Julius Frontinus had been that of the Silures (South Wales); and the last action of Agricola's command was the action at the foot of the Grampian hills, which put him in possession of the whole of Britain as far north as the northern boundary of Perth and Argyle. His first campaign (A. D. 78) was occupied in the reconquest of Mona (Anglesea), and the Ordovices (North Wales), the strongholds of the Druids; and the remainder of this year, with the next, was given to making the before-mentioned arrangements for the security of the Roman dominion in the already conquered parts of Britain. The third campaign (A. D. 80) carried him northwards to the Taus, * As to whether the Taus was the Solw
ho is called Ardashes III., was a mighty prince, who humbled the armies of Domitian, but was finally driven out by Trajan. Chosroes placed on the throne in his stead Parthamasiris, a Parthian prince. Exedares reigned during forty-two years, from A. D. 78 to 120, but was several times compelled to fly from his kingdom. Parthamasiris the son of Pacorus (Arsaces XXIV.), king of Parthia, and the nephew of Chosroes, who supported him against Trajan. Parthamasiris, reduced to extremity, humbled him, the son of Abgarus. --A. D. 36. Sanadrug or Sanatruces, the son of a sister of Abgares, usurps the throne.--A. D. 58. Erowant, an Arsacid by the female line, usurps the throne; conquers all Armenia; cedes Edessa and Mesopotamia to the Romans.--A. D. 78. Ardashes or Artaxes III. (Exedares or Axidares), the son of Sanadrug, established by Vologeses I., king of the Parthians.--A. D. 120. Ardawazt or Artavasdes IV., son of Ardashes III., reigns only some months.-- A. D. 121. Diran or Tiranus I., h
Exedares ´╝łArdashes Iii.) An Arsacid (of the younger Armenian branch), was driven out by Chosroes or Khosrew, king of the Parthians. (D. C. 68.17.) According to Moses Chorenensis (2.44-57), Exedares, who is called Ardashes III., was a mighty prince, who humbled the armies of Domitian, but was finally driven out by Trajan. Chosroes placed on the throne in his stead Parthamasiris, a Parthian prince. Exedares reigned during forty-two years, from A. D. 78 to 120, but was several times compelled to fly from his kingdo
Co'mmodus 1. L. Ceionius Commodus, appears in the Fasti as consul under Vespasian, A. D. 78.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
origin and early career we know nothing, first appears in history under Vespasian, at the beginning of A. D. 70, as praetor urbanus, an office which he speedily resigned in order to make way for Domitian, and it is probable that he was one of the consules suffecti in A. D. 74. In the course of the following year he succeeded Cerealis as governor of Britain, where he distinguished himself by the conquest of the Silures, and maintained the Roman power unbroken until superseded by Agricola in A. D. 78. In the third consulship of Nerva (A. D. 97) Frontinus was nominated curator aquarum, an appointment never conferred, as he himself informs us, except upon the leading men of the state (de Aq. 1; comp. 102); he also enjoyed the high dignity of augur, and his death must have happened about A. D. 106, since his seat in the college was bestowed upon the younger Pliny soon after that period. From an epigram in Martial we might conclude that he was twice elevated to the consulship; but since his
No'via Gens plebeian, was of very little note. Persons of this name are first mentioned in the last century of the republic, but none of the Novii obtained the consulship till A. D. 78.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
n A. D. 74 Vespasian and Titus made a census or enumeration of the Roman citizens, the last that was made. The conversation which is the subject of the Dialogus de Oratoribus [TACITUS] is represented as having taken place in the sixth year of Vespasian, A. D. 75. In the year A. D. 77, the eighth consulship of Vespasianus and the sixth of Titus Caesar, Plinius addressed to Titus his great compilation, intitled Naturalis Historia. In the same year Eusebius records a pestilence at Rome. In A. D. 78 Agricoia was sent to Britain, and he reduced to submission North Wales and the island of Anglesey, which had before been subjected by the Romans, but had revolted under the administration of Suetonius Paullinus. The following year (A. D. 79)Vespasian was guilty of an act of cruelty which marks his character with a stain. Julius Sabinus, who had assumed the title of Caesar in Gaul at the beginning of A. D. 70, was at last discovered, after nine years' concealment, and brought to Rome with hi