hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 4 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 787 AD or search for 787 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

There were three patriarchs of Jerusalem of this name. Elias I. 1. Elias I. was patriarch from A. D. 494 or 495 till his deposition by a council held at Sidon, whose decree was enforced, A. D. 513, by the emperor Anastasius I. He died in exile A. D. 518. Elias Ii. 2. Elias II. held the patriarchate from A. D. 760, or earlier, to 797, with the exception of an interval, when he was expelled by an intrusive patriarch Theodorus. He was represented at the second general council of Nicaea, A. D. 787, by Joannes, a presbyter, and Thomas, principal of the convent of St. Arsenius near Babylon in Egypt: these ecclesiastics were also representatives of the patriarchs of Alexandria and Antioch. Elias Iii. 3. Elias III. was patriarch at least as early as 881, when he sent a letter to Charles le Gros and the prelates, princes, and nobles of Gaul. Elias died about A. D. 907. Works Letter to Charlemagne Editions A Latin version of the letter of Elias to Charlemagne (for it is scarce
Elias Ii. 2. Elias II. held the patriarchate from A. D. 760, or earlier, to 797, with the exception of an interval, when he was expelled by an intrusive patriarch Theodorus. He was represented at the second general council of Nicaea, A. D. 787, by Joannes, a presbyter, and Thomas, principal of the convent of St. Arsenius near Babylon in Egypt: these ecclesiastics were also representatives of the patriarchs of Alexandria and Antioch.
Elias 5. ELIAS of CRETE. There are several works extant ascribed to Elias Cretensis, whom Rader, Cave, Fabricius, and others, suppose to have been Elias, bishop (or rather metropolitan) of Crete, who took part in the second general council of Nicaea, A. D. 787. (Labbe, Concilia, vol. vii.) Leunclavius considers that the author was a different person from the prelate, and places the former in the sixth century or thereabout (Prooemiam in Sti Gragorii Nazianzeni Opera) Oudin, who has examined the subject most carefully, agrees with Leunclavius in distinguishing the writer from the prelate, and deduces from the internal evidence of his works that the writer lived about A. D. 1120 or 1130. Works He wrote:-- 1. Commentaries on several of the Orations of Gregory Nazianzen. There are several MSS. extant of these commentaries in the original Greek, but we believe they have never been printed. A Latin version of them, partly new, partly selected from former translations, was published
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Theo'phanes or Theo'phanes Isaacius (search)
hanes, who had in the meantime discharged various public offices, entered the monastery of Polychronium, near Singriana, in lesser Mysia. He soon left that place, and went to live in the island of Calonymus, where he converted his paternal estate into a monastery. After a residence of six years there, he returned to the neighbourhood of Singriana, where he purchased an estate, called by the simple name of Ager ()/agros), and founded another monastery, of which he made himself the abbot. In A. D. 787, he was summoned to the second Council of Nicaea, where he vehemently defended the worship of images. We have no further details of his life until A. D. 813. when he was required by Leo the Armenian to renounce the worship of images, and, upon his refusal, though he was extremely ill, and had been bed-ridden for five years, he was carried to Constantinople, and there, after a further period of resistance to the command of the emperor to renounce his principles, he was cast into prison, at