Your search returned 64 results in 53 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
e was about thirty-one years of age. The expedition reached Uppernavik August 14th, and on the following morning his body was buried. The funeral was attended by the officers and crew of the United States, and also by the Danish officials. The service was performed by Mr. Alten, the missionary, the chapel bell tolling during the ceremony. While answering the Governor's salute, at Uppernavik, the gun on board the United States burst, injuring one of the men severely. About the 3d of August, early one morning, a block fell from the fore yard, and striking the cook, a Dane, on the head, fractured his skull, severed an artery and knocked him senseless to the deck. He was conveyed below and his wounds dressed. Preparations were now made for entering the ice. The schooner was out of water twenty-one inches more than when she left Boston harbor, having been lightened, adding greatly to her sailing qualities. Dr. Hayes procured forty dogs, secured the services of six Esquimaux,
Patterson Blamed for the Federal Reverends. Washington, August 3. --Secretary Cameron has ordered that all slaves conives will be treated in the same manner. Washington, August 3.--Official dispatches will be published, which will show t Johnston joined Beauregard at Manassas. Washington, August 3.--Letters have been received here from Commodore Eagle, whing himself in regard to their movements. Washington, Aug. 3.--A movement is in operation to deprive the press, either bon to any matters, except actual results. Washington, Aug. 3.--Prince Napoleon was presented by Secretary Seward to-day eason, and is confined at Fort Lafayette. Washington, Aug. 3.--In the House a bill to increase the efficiency of the topnd the gentleman can make the most of it. Washington, Aug. 3.--In the Senate a bill has been passed providing punishmentwriting, or publishing, are alike guilty. Washington, Aug. 3.--In the Senate the bill confiscating rebels property was r
From Missouri.Suppression of News by the Federalists — the reported battle, &c. Louisville, August 3. --A gentleman who has just reached here from St. Louis reports that important dispatches had been received there from Springfield, but had been suppressed. All telegraph messages go direct to Gen. Fremont's headquarters, where the most absolute censorship is exercised over them. A dispatch, dated at Springfield, Mo., July 29, says: Gen. McCulloch is moving slowly forward. His frces are divided into three columns, the better to subsist by forage. The Federal troops are quietly awaiting McCulloch's approach. Gen. Lyon has officially applauded Zeigle. [This dispatch was probably written in St. Louis.] Louisville, Aug. 3.--The St. Louis Democrat, just received, says that Generals Solomon and Zeigle's troops made the first three hundred and fifty miles' travel from Springfield in three days, but does not state under what impulse the time was made. In the course o
"Treason" in the Capitol--Mr. Breckinridge and the Abolitionists. Washington, August 3. --In the Senate, on yesterday, Mr. Breckinridge in the course of some remarks said that the responsibility for the slaughter near Manassas was upon the Government, and further that we were hurling brave fellows into death for principles which three-fourths of them abhorred. Mr. Baker replied that Mr. Breckinridge's appeals were made only to animate our enemies. Were not, he said, the words of the Kentucky Senator words of brilliantly polished treason uttered in the Capitol? Mr. Sumner interrupted Mr. Baker and asked, what would have been done with a Roman Senator similarly conducting himself? Mr. Baker replied, (in a subdued tone,) he would have been hurled from the Tarpean Rock.
Federal Congress. Washington, August 3. --In the Senate today the bill authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to purchase a charter vessel to aid in the collection of the revenue, was passed. A resolution was passed directing that Mrs. Douglas shall receive the arrearages due to Senator Douglas. Washington, August 3.--Energetic measures are being adopted to prevent the transmission of letters Hence to the South. Federal Congress. Washington, August 3. --In the Senate today the bill authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to purchase a charter vessel to aid in the collection of the revenue, was passed. A resolution was passed directing that Mrs. Douglas shall receive the arrearages due to Senator Douglas. Washington, August 3.--Energetic measures are being adopted to prevent the transmission of letters Hence to the South.
Later from Europe. Cape Race, Aug. 3. --The steamship Fulton with Liverpool dates to Wednesday, July 21th, was boarded off this Cape last evening. Liverpool Cotton Market, July 24--The sales of cotton for the past three business days were 40,000 bales, of which speculators and exporters took $2,000 bales. The market advanced 1-16 to ½d., and closed with an advancing tendency. London Money Market.--Consols closed at from 98 7/8a90 for money.
The privateers again. Boston, August 3. --A letter received here written on board the frigate Savannah, lying off Cape Hatteras, states that the Savannah chosed a full rigged 200 tons burthen brig on the shoals. It is supposed that the brig was the Jeff Davis or one of her prizes.
Death of Gen. Floaracy, of Arkansas. Louisville, August 3. --Gen. Floaracy, of Arkansas, an officer in the Confederate Army, died here to-day.
A soldier under arrest. Fortress Monroe, August 3. --A private of the New York Tenth Regiment has been arrested for corresponding with the enemy. A letter was found on his person addressed to L. B. P. Washington.
A Chase on the Ocean. New York, August 3. --The brig Watts, from Pernambuce, reports that she was chased three consecutive days by three different ships, but the Watts outsailed them all.
1 2 3 4 5 6