hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 88 AD or search for 88 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Flaccus, C. Vale'rius All that is known or that can be conjectured with plausibility in regard to this writer may be comprehended in a very few words. From the expressions of his friend Martial (1.62, 77), we learn that he was a native of Padua; from the exordium of his piece, we infer that it was addressed to Vespasian, and published while Titus was achieving the subjugation of Judea; from a notice in Quintilian, Dod well has drawn the conclusion that he must have died about A. D. 88. The lines (5.5), Phoebe, mone, si Cymaeae mihi conscia vatis Stat casta cortina domo, whatever may be their import, are not in themselves sufficient to prove, as Pius and Heinsius imagine, that he was a member of the sacred college of the Quindecimviri; and the words Setinus Balbus, affixed to his name in certain MSS., are much too doubtful in their origin and signification to serve as the basis of any hypothesis, even if we were certain that they applied to the poet himself, and not to some commentator
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Rufus, Minu'cius 10. L. Minucius Rufus, consul A. D. 88. with the emperor Domitian (Fast.).
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
died A. D. 79 , and the procurator cannot have been the historian; but he may have been his father. In an inscription of doubtful authority he is named Cornelius Verus Tacitns. Tacitus was first promoted by, the emperor Vespasian (Hist. i. l). and he received other favours from his sons Titus and Domitian. C. Julius Agricola, who was consul A. D. 77, betrothed his daughter to Tacitus in that year. but the marriage did not take place until the following year. In the reign of Domitian, and in A. D. 88 Tacitus was praetor, and he assisted as one of the quindecemviri at the solemnity of the Luidi Secuiares which ware celebrated in that year, the fourteenth consulship of Domitian (Annal. 11.11.) Agricola died at Rome A. D. 93, but neither Tacitus nor the daughter of Agricola was then with him. It is not known where Tacitus was during the last illness of Agricola, for the assumption that he ever visited either Britain or Germany cannot be proved. He appears to say that he was himself a wi