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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 89 AD or search for 89 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Justi'nus Martyr (search)
lis, or the New City of Flavia (Justin. Apolog. Prima, c. 1), which arose out of the ruins, and in the immediate vicinity of the ancient town, called Shechem in the Old Testament and Sychar in the New. The year of his birth is not known: Dodwell, Grabe (Spicileg. SS. Patrum, saec. ii. p. 147), and the Bollandists (Acta Sanctorum, April. vol. ii. p. 110, note c), conjecture from a passage of Epiphanius (Adv. Haeres. 46.1), which, as it now stands, is clearly erroneous, that he was born about A. D. 89; but this conjecture (which is adopted by Fabricius) is very uncertain, though sufficiently in accordance with the known facts of his history. Tillemnont and Ceillier place the birth of Justin in A. D. 103, Maran in A. D. 114, Halloix in A. D. 118. He was the son of Priscus Bacchius, or rather of Priscus, the son of Bacchius, and was brought up as a heathen; for though he calls himself a Samaritan (Apoloq. Secunda, 100.15, Dialog. cuma Tryphone, 100.120), he appears to mean no more than tha
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
XII., or sometimes, Institutiones Oratoriae, dedicated to his friend Marcellus Victorius, himself a celebrated orator, and a favourite at court. (Stat. Silv. 4.4.) It was written during the reign of Domitian, while the author was discharging his duties as preceptor to the sons of the emperor's niece (Prooem. lib. 4.10.1.9). In a short preface to his bookseller Trypho, he acquaints us that he commenced this undertaking after he had retired from his labours as a public instructor (probably in A. D. 89), and that he finished his task in little more than two years. This period appears, at first sight, short for the completion of a performance so comprehensive and so elaborate, but we may reasonably believe that his professional career had rendered him so familiar with the subject, and that in his capacity as a lecturer he must have so frequently enlarged upon all its different branches, that little would be necessary except to digest and arrange the materials already accumulated. Indeed, i