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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 12 12 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 2 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for 93 AD or search for 93 AD in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Agricola (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 43 (search)
The death of Agricola (A. D. 93) was felt by his family with the deepest sorrow, by his friends with tender concern, and even by foreigners with universal regret. During his illness, the common people were constantly at his door, making their inquiries. In the forum, and all circular meetings, he was the subject of conversation. When he breathed his last, no man was so hardened as to rejoice at the news. He died lamented, and not soon forgotten. What added to the public affliction, was a report that so valuable a life was ended by a dose of poison. No proof of the fact appearing, I leave the story to shift for itself. Thus much is certain, during his illness, instead of formal messages, according to the usual practice of courts, the freedmen most in favour, and the principal physicians of the Emperor, were assiduous in their visits. Was this the solicitude of friendship, or were these men the spies of state? On the day that closed his life, while he was yet in the agony of death, the
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Agricola (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 44 (search)
us, in the fifty-sixth year of his age.There seems, in this place, to be some mistake, not, however, imputable to Tacitus, but, more probably, to the transcribers, who, in their manuscript, might easily write LVI. instead of LIV. Caligula's third consulship was A. U. C. 793, A. D. 40. Agricola was born on the thirteenth of June in that year: he died on the ioth of the calends of September, that is the 23d of August, in the consulship of Pompeius Collega and Cornelius Priscus, A. U. C, 846, A. D. 93. According to this account, Agricola, on the 13th of June, A. U. C. 846, entered on the fifty-fourth year of his age, and died in the month of August following. It is, therefore, probable, that the copyists, as already observed, inserted in their manuscript fifty-six for fifty-four. [His life extended through the reigns of nine emperors, from Caligula to Domitian.] As to his person, about which in future times there may be some curiosity, he was of that make and stature which may be said to