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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 12 12 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 2 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 93 AD or search for 93 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AUGUSTIANA, DOMUS (search)
en the dentils, a characteristic of Domitian's work (BC 1918, 35). Two fragments of a marble epistyle, bearing an inscription in letters once filled with bronze, which now lie at the main entrance of the palace and were doubtless found there, are attributed to the reign of Vespasian (CILvi. 31496a) but might betterbe assigned to the beginning of that of Domitian (81-83 A.D.). The inscription may have related to the construction of a porticus. The building is described by Martial, writing in 93 A.D., as a lofty pile (viii. 36) ; in ib. 39 he alludes to the completion of the triclinium, of which Statius (Silv. iv. 2) also speaks, in a poem of extravagant praise; cf. also Mart. i. 70; viii. 60; ix. 13, 79; xii. 15. Suetonius (Dom. 14) tells us that Domitian had the walls of the porticoes in which he usually walked lined with selenite (phengites lapis), so that he would see what was going on behind him; but otherwise we have little definite information, and practically nothing about the f
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, FORTUNA REDUX, TEMPLUM (search)
FORTUNA REDUX, TEMPLUM a temple built by Domitian in the campus Martius after his triumphal entry into Rome in 93 A.D. after the war in Germany (Mart. viii. 65; Claudian. de sext. cons. Honor. i). It may be represented on a coin of 174 A.D. and on a relief of the same period on the arch of Constantine (Cohen, M. Aurel. 3; PBS iii. 259-262), and if so, it was probably near the present Piazza di Venezia (HJ 501 ; RE vii. 38; Rosch. i. 1526; for an erroneous theory that this temple was the ara Fortunae reducis of Augustus, see BC 1908, 122-124). See ARCUS DOMITIANI (1).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
uilds cryptoporticus from it to Caelian (?), 10; dedicates Arch of Titus, 45: establishes four Ludi, 320; erects Obelisk now in Piazza Navona, 369; begins Trajan's Forum (?), 237; Circus Maximus injured by fire, 117; Horti Domitiae formed, 267. 82Capitoline Temple dedicated, 300. 88Tunnel for Aqua Claudia under Mons Aeflanus (near Tibur), 22. 89The' Trofei di Mario,' 363. 91The Equus Domitiani in the Forum, 201. 92The palaces on the Palatine completed, 159. 93Temple of Fortuna Redux, 218. 94The Curia restored, 144. 94-95The Mica Aurea, 341. 96The Meta Sudans, 340. 96-98Reign of Nerva: he dedicates the Forum Nervae or Transitorium, 227; builds Horrea, 262; additions to the Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6. 98-117Reign of Trajan: Temple of Fortuna, 214; Ara of Pudicitia, 433; Naumachia, 358; rostra and plutei, 453-4; restores Circus Maximus, 117; builds Theatre in Campus Martius, 518; Amphithe