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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 969 AD or search for 969 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Eusta'thius Roma'nus 1. A celebrated Graeco-Roman jurist. Of the noble family of the Maleini, he was honoured with the rank of Patricius, and filled various high offices at Constantinople. He was first a puisne judge (lito\s krith/s) under Romanus junior (Basil. vii. p. 677, schol.), and continued to fill the same office under Nicephorus Phocas (reigned A. D. 963-969), then was made Quaestor, and was afterwards made Magister Officiorum under Basileius Bulgaroctonus (reigned 975-1025). Basileius Porphyrogenitus, in a novell inserted in the collection of Leunclavius (J. G. R. ii. p. 173), speaks of the uninterrupted prosperity of his family for 100 or 120 years. (Zachariae, Hist. Jur. Gr. Rom. Delin. p. 58; Heimbach, de Basil. Orig. p.79.) Works He is quoted by the four appellations, Eustathius, Patricius, Romanus, and Magister. Romaica Harmenopulus, in the Prolegomena to his Hexabiblon (§ 20), mentions his obligations to the Romaica, of Magister, who was evidently a judge as w
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Joannes I. Zimisces (*)Iwa/nnhs *Tzimiskh=s), emperor of Constantinople (A. D. 969-976), was descended from an illustrious Armenian family. He was the grandson of Theophilus, whose name was conspicuous during the reign of Romanus I. Lecapenus, and the grand-nephew of Curcuas, the brother of Theophilus, who was still more eminent. The surname Zimisces was given to Joannes on account of his diminutive size, that word signifying in the Armenian language a man of very small stature. Zimisces served from his early youth in the Greek armies, and astonished both his friends and foes by the heroic deeds which he performed on the field of battle. During the regency of Theophano, the widow of the emperor Romanus, Nicephorus Phocas became the leader of the empire, and was constantly supported by Zimisces, who saved him from ruin when the eunuch Bringas conspired against his life. Believing that the friendship between Nicephorus and Zimisces was only pretended, Bringas wrote to Zimisces, offerin
ten a considerable time after the death of Damascenus, which occurred about A. D. 756, or perhaps later [DAMASCENUS JOANNES], and after the cessation of the Iconoclastic contest, which may be regarded as having terminated on the death of the emperor Theophilus, A. D. 842. But we have no data for determining how long after these events the author lived. Le Quien identifies him with a Joannes, patriarch of Jerusalem, who was burnt alive by the Saracens in the latter part of the reign (A. D. 963-969) of Nicephorus Phocas, upon suspicion that he had excited that emperor to attack them. (Cedrenus, Compend. p. 661, ed. Paris, vol. ii. p. 374, ed. Bonn.) Editions The life of Joannes Damascenus was first published at Rome, with the orations of Damascenus, De Sacris Imaginibus, 8vo. Rome, 1553: it was reprinted at Basel with the works of Damascenus A. D. 1575; and in the Acta Sanctorum Maii (a. d. 6), vol. ii. (the Latin version in the body of the work, p. 111, &c., and the original in the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Nice'phorus Ii. Phocas (*Nikhfo/ros o( *Fwka=s), emperor of Constantinople A. D. 963-969, was the son of the celebrated Bardas Phocas, and was born in or about 912. He owed his elevation to those great military capacities which were hereditary in his family, and through which he obtained a fame that places him by the side of Narses, Belisarius, and the emperors Heraclius, Mauricius, and Tiberius. In 954 Constantine VII. Porphyrogenitus appointed him magnus domesticus, and his brothers Leo and Constantine, next to him the best generals, were also entrusted with great military commands. The Greeks were then at war with the khalif Modhi, against whom Nicephorus and his brothers marched in 956. The first campaign was rather disastrous to the Greeks, who were defeated in a pitched battle in which Constantine Phocas was taken prisoner by the Arabs, who afterwards put him to death. In 958 Nicephorus and Leo took a terrible revenge. Chabgan, the Arab emir of Aleppo, the terror of the Christi
le to the notice of the imperial brothers Basil II. and Constantine IX., apparently at the time when they were yet in their boyhood, and were emperors in name only, the reins of empire being really held successively by Nicephorus Phocas (A. D. 963-969) and John Tzimisces (A. D. 969-975). After the sudden death of the uncle by whom he had been introduced at court, Symeon determined, though only fourteen years of age, to embrace a monastic life; but the monk Symeon the Pious (*Snmew\n o( eu)labh/A. D. 969-975). After the sudden death of the uncle by whom he had been introduced at court, Symeon determined, though only fourteen years of age, to embrace a monastic life; but the monk Symeon the Pious (*Snmew\n o( eu)labh/s), or as Combéfis styles him, " Venerabilis," the Venerable [No. 24], whom he had chosen for his spiritual guide and father, having advised him to defer his purpose, he returned for a time to the house of his deceased uncle. At a somewhat later period he commenced his noviciate in the Monastery of Studium at Constantinople; but was induced by the envy of the abbot and some of the monks, excited by his pre-eminence in monastic practices, to remove to the Monastery of St. Mamas, where he complet