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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 976 AD or search for 976 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Constanti'nus Ix. emperor of the East, A. D. 976-1028, the son of the emperor Romanus II., was born in A. D. 961, and began to reign, together with his elder brother, Basil II., in 976 ; but, addicted to idleness and luxury, he took no part in the administration of the empire. After the death of Basil in 1025, he became sole emperor; but, fortunately for his subjects, who suffered much from the Arabians during his miserable administration, he died three years afterwards, in 1028. Constantine IX. was the last of the Macedonian dynasty. His successor was Romanus Argyrus, the husband of his daughter Zoe, whom he had by his wife Helena Augusta. [BASILIUS II.]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Joannes I. Zimisces (*)Iwa/nnhs *Tzimiskh=s), emperor of Constantinople (A. D. 969-976), was descended from an illustrious Armenian family. He was the grandson of Theophilus, whose name was conspicuous during the reign of Romanus I. Lecapenus, and the grand-nephew of Curcuas, the brother of Theophilus, who was still more eminent. The surname Zimisces was given to Joannes on account of his diminutive size, that word signifying in the Armenian language a man of very small stature. Zimisces served from his early youth in the Greek armies, and astonished both his friends and foes by the heroic deeds which he performed on the field of battle. During the regency of Theophano, the widow of the emperor Romanus, Nicephorus Phocas became the leader of the empire, and was constantly supported by Zimisces, who saved him from ruin when the eunuch Bringas conspired against his life. Believing that the friendship between Nicephorus and Zimisces was only pretended, Bringas wrote to Zimisces, offerin