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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 5, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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ion, at the turning point of its first half century, is to become an American epic in which nearly three and a half million men gathered on the battle-line to offer their lives for principles that were dear to them. It is as an American Battle Abbey that these pages are opened on this anniversary, so that the eyes of the generations may look upon the actual scenes — not upon the tarnished muskets, the silenced cannon, nor the battle-stained flag, but upon the warriors themselves standing on blinded by heart wounds, but as Americans we can see only the heroic self-sacrifice of these men who battled for the decision of one of the world's greatest problems. In this first volume, standing literally before the open door to the Battle Abbey, in which the vision of war is to be revealed in all its reality, I take this privilege to refer briefly to a few of the intimate desires that have led to this revelation of The photographic history of the Civil War. As one stands in the library
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
, not unmindful of their valor, not ungrateful for this filial devotion, shall keep forever bright the splendor of their deeds, till earth, and seas, and skies are rended. No Painted Porch is hers, like that of Athens, where, for half a thousand years, the descendants of the men who had followed Miltiades to victory might trace the glories of their Marathon — no gleaming Chapelle des Invalides, with the light flaming through gorgeous windows on tattered flags of battle — no grand historic Abbey, like that of England, where hard by the last resting place of her princes and her kings sleep the great soldiers who have writ glorious names high upon their country's roll with the point of their stainless swords. Nay, none of this is hers. Only the frosty stars to-night keep solemn watch and ward above the wind-swept graves of those who, from Potomac to James, from Rapidan to Appomattox, yielded up their lives that they might transmit to their children the heritage of their fathers.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
lonial time, are remarkable for their civil geniality amid rude circumstances, and for their touches of cultivated irony. Madam Sarah Kemble Knight (1666-1727),Ibid. in her diary written in the pauses of her horseback journeys between Boston and New York in 1704 and 1705, recorded in a most amusing manner the humours of the rough roads, the perilous crossing of rivers, the intolerable inns, and the coarse speech of the inland rustics. John Seccomb (1708-93) wrote a piece of verse called Father Abbey's will (1732) facetiously describing the estate of Matthew Abdy, sweeper, bed-maker, and bottle-washer to Harvard College. These lines found their way into The gentleman's magazine. Joseph Green, See also Book I, Chap. IX. who became well known for his puns, has left us some mischievous lines on Doctor Byles's cat (1733). The popular impression of Green is embodied in an epitaph which was written for him by one of his friends: Siste, Viator, Here lies one Whose life was whim, w
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Evolution and religion, 214, 217 Ewing. William. 55 Examiner (Richmond), 184, 296 Excelsior, 36 Express (N. Y.), 187 Eyes and ears, 215 Fable for critics, a, 246, 250 Fairy Book, the, 400 Faith Gartney's girlhood, 398 Fall of Richmond, the, 279, 285 Fall of the House of Usher, the, 68 Fanshawe, 19 Farewell to Pope, 305 Farewell to the world, 200 Farmer and the cities, the, 322 Farmer's Allminax, 157 Farmer's Museum, the, 179 Farragut, 277, 285 Father Abbey's will, 149 Faxon, F. N., 171 Federalist, the, 74, 180 Femmes Savantes, 234 Fenno, John, 180, 181, 182 Ferdinand, King, 125 Ferdinand and Isabella, 126, 128 Ferussac, Baron de, 209 Field, Eugene, 242, 243, 409 Fielding, Henry, 340 Fields, James T., 49, 167 Finch, Francis Miles, 286, 303 Finley, Martha, 398 Fish, Hamilton, 144 Fiske, John, 222 Flash, Henry Linden, 291, 298, 300, 301, 302, 306, 307, 309, 311 Flint, Timothy, 167 Florida Sunday, a, 344
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
and assigned to the cavalry brigade of General Clanton. A regiment of reserves was formed and Thomas put in command. This command was extended, and on August 14, 1864, he was commissioned brigadier-general. He commanded a brigade of Alabama reserves under General Withers, consisting of the First, Second and Third Alabama reserves, afterward called the Sixty-first, Sixty-second and Sixty-third Alabama regiments, of the Confederate States provisional army, also the Seventh Alabama cavalry, Abbey's Mississippi battery, Wade's Louisiana battery and Winston's Tennessee battery. General Thomas served in the department commanded by Gen. Dabney H. Maury and Gen. Richard Taylor until the close of the war, and participated in the defense of Spanish Fort and Blakely. After peace he returned to Georgia and engaged in the business of planting in Dooly county until 1887. Then he moved to Dalton, where he adopted the profession of a teacher. Brigadier-General Edward Lloyd Thomas Brigadie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
ed a grand memorial in the sight of the thickest fray, and placed the high altar of the Abbey over the very spot where Harold fell. This memorial he called Battle-Abbey. He dedicated it to the Norman, St. Peter, and placed it in charge of an order of Norman monks. The banner and the shields of those who died on that stricken fieago passed to profane uses, and the flags of the conqueror and his knights have faded into dust. It cannot be so with the memorial of the Confederacy. The Battle-Abbey commemorated a ruthless raid of robbers, who took by the strong hand and lived with disregard of blood. There was not a principle of honor, of chivalry, of justice, or right in that attack upon a nation and in that overthrow of a race. With the power that established it, Battle-Abbey fell and disintegrated. No lost cause. Our memorial will be here in Richmond, the heart and grave of the Confederacy, and around it hovers the immortal soul of love and of memory, which for all times wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll.D. (search)
a portion of his valuable work was presented. Since then, for purposes of reference, Dr. Jones recalled his Ms. It is to be hoped that his representatives will restore it to the custody of the Society. R. A. B. Index. Alexander, General E. P., 232. Appomattox Courthouse, Heth's Division at, 56, 306. Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, Proceedings and Officers of, 1. Atkinson, Colonel, John Wilder, 175. Bath and Romney Expedition, Hardships of, 124, 126. Battle Abbey of the South, 371. Battle, Dr., Kemp. P., 314. Baylor, Major E. W., 38. Beauregard, General G. T., Ability of, 67. Bernard, George S,, 294. Blackford, L. M., 336 Blount's Creek Bridge, Action at, 44. Bottom's Bridge, Battle of, 63. Brander, General T. A., 337. Breathed, Major, James, 309. Bristow Station, Battle of, 47. Brooks, Captain U. R., 25. Bryan, Mrs., Joseph, 363, 380. Burgess' Mill, Battle of, 54. Butler, General M. C., Exploits of, 25. Butler bottled
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
The officers captured at Port Hudson were from Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, I think. There were thirteen negroes, all of whom remained faithful to the end, and although we had barely enough to eat to keep us alive, we divided equally with our servants. I am glad to be able to record the name of Pen, who was one of the faithful servants among the thirteen. He belonged to Lieutenant Coleman, of Robert's Mississippi Battery, also Dave Jackson, who belonged to James W. Maddox, of Abbey's Battery. Dave Jackson and Pen, like George, refused numerous offers from the Yankees and returned home with their masters. I have information also of a most devoted servant, who belonged to the Schnexnaydres, of St. James Parish (who were members of Watson's Battery). This negro stated to the Yankees, at the surrender of Port Hudson, I love my white folks above the freedom you talk about, and if I am ever free it got to come from them. Dr. Christian was unable to remember the names o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
e Abbey placed in Virginia first took form, twelve years ago: Editor of the Times: The Battle Abbey of the Confederacy should be upon Virginia soil, not necessarily in Richmond, for want of space.ich has now become with the soil indigenous—the most fitting place to choose to make this Battle Abbey. No need to choose towns or cities, upon which to place this great corporation, which is to be The proprietors of the land adjacent to these battlefields will give the land for this Battle Abbey. They who own the ground where the seven days fight was fought, when the whole Confederate armyuccesss. Stifle them, and sooner or later your cause will weaken. We should build this Battle Abbey upon a safe foundation, if we would preserve it as an object lesson to teach our children the pron of Adjutant J. Taylor Stratton, recommending that the Confederate Memorial building or Battle Abbey, be located at the intersection of Monument Avenue and the Boulevard, or at some point along the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ver sets on U. S. flag, 71 Anderson, Gen. Joseph R., 256 Andersonville Prison, 1 Location healthful and salubrious, 5 Its humane commander, Wirz, 5 Rations at 6 Mortality between Federal and Confederate prisons contrasted, 7 226 President Davis in no way responsible for conditions at, 8 Appomattox C. H., Last of the 14th Va. Cavalry at, 13. Confederate Generals at, 15 Ashbrooke. W. M., 26 Augustin, James A., 140 Barksdale Gen. Wm., 17 Bartlett, U. S. H., Gen., 168 Battle Abbey of the Confederacy, Location of decided 166 Bond of Trustees of, 160 Beauregard, Gen. P. G. T., 76 Birdsong, J. C., 360 Black Horse Troop The. 297 Blandford Cemetery, Tribute of Love to Dead Buried there 186 Bloody Angle, Story of the, 206 Bond. E. Holmes 225 Bouldin, Capt. E. E, 13 Breckinridge, Gen. John C., at Meechums, 102 Brock, R. A., 28 Brooks, Capt. W. R., 152 Burgess, W. W. 124 Burgwyn, Col. W. K., How Killed at Gettysburg, 245 Calhoun, John C on Secessi
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