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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
of 1818 he made several excursions and a considerable journey in Spain and Portugal; whence in November he went via England to Paris again. Here he privately studied Spanish literature, Portuguese, and Provencal. In London in January, 1819, he dropped study for awhile, and was taken up by the great Whigs—Lord Holland, Sir James Mackintosh, Richard Heber, Hookham Frere, Lord John Russell, and Sydney Smith. He visited the Marquis of Salisbury at Hatfield House and the Duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey; again touched classical studies in a sojourn at Cambridge; and before February reached Edinburgh. Picking out, as was usual with him, a specialist to help him in his studies, he read Scotch poetry. Here he frequented the Tory circle of Mrs. Grant of Laggan, and made the acquaintance of Scott, whom he visited at Abbotsford for a few days; proceeding thence to Southey at Keswick and to Wordsworth at Rydal Mount. At Hatton he saw old Dr. Parr once more, who condemned everything contempor
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
the North. I went, however, at first, no farther than Bedfordshire, where I passed three days at the splendid seat of the Duke of Bedford. The entrance to Woburn Abbey is by a Roman gateway opening into the park, through which you are conducted, by an avenue of venerable elms, through fine varieties of hill and dale, woodlanber was seriously diminished. I had the more time and opportunity to see the establishment and become acquainted with its inhabitants. Considered as a whole, Woburn Abbey is sometimes called the finest estate in England. As I went over it, I thought I should never find an end to all its arrangements and divisions. Within—besidintance I have had much pleasure. They had met in Italy. See ante, p. 166. On the 4th February I left the hospitality, kindness, and quiet enjoyment of Woburn Abbey, and went over to Cambridge. . . . . Of the society at Cambridge I had a pretty fair specimen, I imagine, though I passed only three days there. The first aft
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
), 474. Wiegel, 179. Wilberforce, William, 297. Wilde, Mr., 14. Wilkes, John, 55. Wilkes, Miss (Mrs. Jeffrey), 42. Wilkie, Sir, David, 421, 422, 425, 448. 449. William IV., King of England, 409. Williams, Friend, 337 note, 385. Williams, Miss, Helen Maria, 130, 132, 135, 138. Williams, Samuel, 297 and note. Willis, Mr., of Caius College, 436. Wilmot, Mr., 411. Wilson, John, 278 and note. Winckelmann, J. J., 178. Winder, General, 29. Wirt, William, 33, 351. Woburn Abbey, 269, 270. Wolf, F. A., 105-107, 112, 114, 124. Woodbury, L., 381. Woodward, Mrs., 4, 7, 273, 276. Woodward, Professor, 6. Woodward, William H., 4, 7, 250. Wordsworth, Miss, 287, 432. Wordsworth, Mrs., 287, 432. Wordsworth, William, 287, 288, 411, 432-434. Wortley, Hon., Stuart, 408 note. Wyse, 183 note. Y York, England, 272; Musical Festival in, 435-437. Yorke, Colonel, Richard, 442. Z Zacharia, Judge, 103. Zaragoza, Maid of, 206. Zeschau, Count, 460. Ze
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
ter, who had been your companion from childhood, and whose empty seat by your hearth makes you feel very desolate, touches me nearly. I am old,—almost seventythree,—and the few friends of my youth and riper years, that have remained to me until now, are constantly dropping away. One has fallen this week. Another will go soon. And the rest must follow before long, whether it pleases God that I should precede them or not. In 1819 I spent two or three days with the Duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey. See Vol. I. p. 268. There was a brilliant party there, just at the end of the shooting-season,—the old Lord Spencer, Frere, the Jerseys, etc. One forenoon I remember that, with your brother, and a clergyman whose name I have forgotten, I walked a good deal about the grounds and park. Lord John was at home, and my recollections of him—with whom I have kept up some intercourse from time to time ever since—and of your brother are most agreeable, as they are, indeed, of the whole vis
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
William, II. 372. Williams, Miss, Helen Maria, I. 130, 132, 135, 138. Williams, Mr., Samuel, I. 297 and note. Willis, Mr., of Caius College, I. 436. Wilmot, Mr., I. 411. Wilson, II. 361. Wilson, John, I. 278 and note, II. 163, 164. Wilson, Professor, II. 155. Winckelmann, J. J., I. 178, II. 59. Winder, General, I. 29. Winsor, Justin, II. 318. Winthrop, Hon. Robert C., II. 263, 305, 470. Wirt, William, I 33, 351. Wiseman, Dr. (Cardinal), it. 73, 77, 80. Woburn Abbey, I. 269, 270, II. 466. Wolf. F. A., philologist, I. 105, 106, 107, 112, 114, 124. Wolf, Ferdinand, II. 2, 256 note, 260, 314; letter to, 274. Wolff, Emil, II. 58, 59, 84. Woodbury, L., T. 381. Woods' Hole, visits, II. 187, 196. Woodward, Mrs., I 4, 7, 273, 276. Woodward, Professor, I. 6. Woodward, William H., I. 4, 7, 250. Wordsworth, Miss, I. 287, 432. Wordsworth, Mrs., I. 287, 432, II. 167. Wordsworth, William, I. 287, 288, 411, 432, 433, 434, II. 85, 86, 97, 9
onger be administered by a party, which had for its principle to fight up alike against the king and against the people. The inebriate Granville, the President of the Council, would have infused his jovial intrepidity into the junto of Fox; but Fox himself was desponding. Walpole's Memoires. Bedford had his scheme, which he employed Rigby to establish; and when it proved impracticable, indulged himself in reproaches, and the display of Bedford Corr. II. 245. anger, and withdrew to Woburn Abbey. In the midst of war, the country was left to anarchy. We are undone, said Chesterfield; at home, by our increasing expenses; abroad, by ill-luck and incapacity; the Elector of Hesse, the Grand Duke of Brunswick, destitute of the common honesty of hirelings, were in the market to be bid for by the enemies of their lavish employer; the King of Prussia, Britain's only ally, seemed overwhelmed, Hanover reduced, and the French were masters in America. So dark an hour, so gloomy a prospect,