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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 27 19 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 22 10 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 12, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain. You can also browse the collection for Abbott or search for Abbott in all documents.

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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 1: from Massachusetts to Virginia. (search)
een promised a commission at an earlier date than any found in it,--such as Captain Abbott, who must have followed soon after Colonel Andrews. Other names brought of enlisted men on the date of their arrival at camp were as follows:-- Captain AbbottfullMay 11. Captain Coggswell75 menMay 14. Captain Savage42 menMay 14. Cand on the other side a statement of the condition of the companies, as follows: Abbott, full; Quincy, probably full; Savage, 80; Curtis, 80; Cary (Lowell men), 80; Ument, detailed to take possession, came in sight under command of its captain,--Abbott of Lowell,--a single piece of artillery, borrowed from the City of Roxbury, mane, and Brook Farm was baptized Camp Andrew. On Sunday, the twelfth of May, Captain Abbott made to me his first report of the condition of matters in camp. We reacaithful, conspicuous in the most exacting demands of his rank; Savage and Cary, Abbott, Williams, and Robeson, in the tornado of fire that swept their heroic souls fr
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
had lifted the veil and pointed to the shadows of coming events, Mudge would still have rung out, as he threw himself at the head of his regiment, to die at Gettysburg, Forward the Second! It is murder, but it is an order. Dwight would still have traced with fainting hand, as his life-blood was wasting away at Antietam, I think I die in victory. Shaw would still have moved forward, though before him had opened the path which later led to his noble death on the parapet of Wagner. Savage, Abbott, and Cary, Williams, Goodwin, and Perkins, would not have faltered if before them had been mirrored their own silent forms clasped in the cold embrace of death on the field of Cedar Mountain; nor would the rank and file that made so rich the history of the Second, with their sublime courage on many historic fields, have put away the cup from their lips, but would have drunk it even to the very dregs. It was on the twenty-first day of October that an order, issuing from General Banks, to h
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
nel George H. Gordon: Send forward your battery with'all possible despatch. And still the cry was, On they come; as yet again the orders came: Send back the ordnance train with all possible despatch; and Send forward to General Abercrombie to return with all his trains to Winchester; and General Williams expects you to leave one regiment at Berryville, with one section of artillery; and Colonel Andrews hopes I will leave some other force to guard the bridge and ordnance train, and send Captain Abbott's company to report to him. From the multitude of despatches and orders that poured fast and furious upon me, it was evident that a battle was imminent, and that I was expected to push on to be in time to take a hand. When I reached Winchester it was late in the evening. I had done two days work in one,had marched twenty-six miles. Banks was at Middletown. There had been a fight; Shields's division had whipped Jackson, who was now being pursued by Banks, and the urgent calls upon m
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 5: return to Strasburg (continued)—Banks's flight to WinchesterBattle of Winchester. (search)
out, moved forward, supported by the Twenty-eighth New York and a section of Best's Battery. As Companies A and C, Captains Abbott and Cogswell, passed through the main street, followed by supporting companies of the regiment, the enemy, posted in endured, while the Second Massachusetts were firing occasional volleys, and dropping shots were heard on the left by Captain Abbott's company, let us step over and look into the enemy's camp. As the plan of Jackson's attack, it will be rememberedtheir head, were upon us. Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews had thrown out as his rearguard two companies of the Second (Captains Abbott and Cogswell), with a third company (Captain Williams) as flankers. At a short distance in advance were the remainiby a volley delivered at short range with perfect coolness and great effect. Major Dwight's formation was judicious: Captain Abbott commanded one platoon, posted on one side of the road; Captain Cogswell another, on the other side ; while in the cen
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Mountain (continued). (search)
of the Second Massachusetts. On the extreme right of the Second was brave Captain Goodwin, fighting Company K most valiantly and fearlessly; and in front was Captain Abbott with his company, in the open field, where upon our arrival he had deployed his skirmishers, who were lying down and firing upon the enemy. Now, in front afficers and fifty-two of the non-commissioned officers and privates were instantly killed or mortally wounded. The losses of the Second had been terrible: Captains Abbott, Cary, Williams, and Goodwin, and Lieutenant Perkins, were dead; Major Savage was mortally wounded and a prisoner; Captain Quincy and Lieutenant Millen were wecond Massachusetts infantry, by A. H. Quint, pp.110, 111. Surrounded by many of their men killed in the action, I saw dead upon the field Captains Cary, Goodwin, Abbott, Williams, and Lieutenant Perkins. Major Savage had been removed, to die at Charlottesville. Never in the entire history of the Second Massachusetts Regiment h
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
Index A Abbott, Captain, of the Second Mass. Regiment, 12. His first report to General Gordon from Camp Andrew, 14. Is in the fight in Banks's flight to Winchester, 219. In battle of Cedar Mountain, 311, where he is killed. 332. Abercrombie, General, Federal brigade commander, 88, , 10, 109, 118. Allan, William, his Jackson's Valley Campaign --extracts from, 114, 127, 175, 177, 180-183, 187, 189, 235, 236, 251. Andrew, Governor, his early preparation for the Civil War, 1, 2. Cooperates with General Gordon in enlisting and forming the Second Mass. Regiment, 3 et seq.; applies for commission for friends in same, 10, 11. Urges the War Department to accept more troops from Mass., 15. His action in regard to a case of discipline of an officer of the Second Mass. Regiment, 20-22. Controversy of, with General Gordon concerning the appointment of officers in the Second Mass. Regiment, 91-95. His proclamation after the battle of Winchester, 255. His connection with the