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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 27 19 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 22 10 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 12, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Abbott or search for Abbott in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument to the Confederate dead at the University of Virginia. (search)
er the command of Lane Brandon, my quondum classmate at Yale. In skirmishing with the head of the Federal column—led, I think, by the Twentieth Massachusetts—Brandon captured a few prisoners, and learned that the advance company was commanded by Abbott, who had been his chum at Harvard Law School, when the war began. He lost his head completely. He refused to retire before Abbott. He fought him fiercely, and was actually driving him back. In this he was violating orders, and breaking our Abbott. He fought him fiercely, and was actually driving him back. In this he was violating orders, and breaking our plan of battle. He was put under arrest, and his subaltern brought the command out of town. Buck Denman, a Mississippi bear hunter and a superb specimen of manhood, was color-sergeant of the Twenty-first and a member of Brandon's company. He was tall and straight, broad-shouldered and deep-chested, had an eye like an eagle and a voice like a bull of Bashan, and was full of pluck and power as a panther. He was rough as a bear in manner, but withal, a noble, tender-hearted fellow, and a sple
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
ast gateway to the South, as long as there was a ray of hope? I had a right to believe that the troops which General Lee sent to our assistance would rescue us, and if Bragg had ordered Hoke to assault with his division late that afternoon we would have recovered the works. I have positive information that so determined was our resistance that General Terry sent word to General Ames, commanding the three brigades assaulting us, to make one more effort and if unsuccessful to retire. General Abbott, who commanded a brigade, and who lived in North Carolina after the war, told Captain Braddy that at one time during our fight only one colored brigade held Bragg's army in check, and they were so demoralized that five hundred veteran troops could have captured them. But an all-wise Providence decreed that our gallant garrison should be overwhelmed. In less than an hour after I refused to surrender, a fourth brigade (three were already in the fort) entered the sally-port and swept th