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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 2 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 5 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Henry L. Abbott or search for Henry L. Abbott in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

wounded while acting with the artillery, to which he formerly belonged, and in which he was deeply interested. Captain H. F. Clark, Chief of Subsistence Department. Major Meyer, Signal Officer, and Major Malcolm McDonnell, who acted as aides. Surgeon W. S. King, and Assistant Surgeon Magruder, Medical Department. Major J. G. Barnard, Engineer, and senior of his department with the army, gave most important aid. First Lieutenant Fred. S. Prime, Engineers. Captain A. W. Whipple. First Lieutenant H. L. Abbott, and Second Lieutenant H. S. Putnam, Topographical Engineers. Major W. F. Barry, Fifth Artillery, Chief of Artillery. Lieutenant George C. Strong, Ordnance Officer. Major W. H. Wood, First Infantry, Acting Inspector-General. Second Lieutenant Guy Henry, who joined me on the field, was of service as an aide-de-camp. The following officers commanded divisions and brigades, and in the several places their duty called them, did most effective service and behaved in the most galla
in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 17th Infantry. Engineers.--Major J. G. Barnard; First-Lieutenant F. E. Prime. Topographical Engineers.--Captain A. W. Whipple; First-Lieutenant Henry L. Abbott; Second-Lieutenant Haldimand S. Putnam. Quartermaster's Department.--Captain O. H. Tillinghast, Assistant Quartermaster. Subsistence Department.--Capt. H. F. Clarke, Commissary of Subsistence. Medical Department.--Surgeon, W. S. King; Assistant Surgeon, David L. Magruder. First Division. Brigadier-General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, commanding. First Brigade.--Col. E. D. Keyes, 11th Infantry, commanding. 1st, 2d, & 3d Regiments Connecticut Volunteers; 4th Regime
o'clock A. M. The rear-guard of the victorious Twenty-second Illinois have just returned to camp, under command of Capt. Abbott. We now foot up our entire loss: killed--Capt. William Sharp, Company A. Wounded--Lieutenant-Colonel Ransom, slightl Information having been received on Monday morning that the enemy were assembled in considerable force at Charleston, Capt. Abbott and a portion of his command were sent out in the fore part of the day for the purpose of reconnoissance, and also to ht the train arrived with six companies, about three hundred men, under command of Col. Dougherty. He was informed by Capt. Abbott that the enemy's strength at Charleston was 1,000, and also that he had received reliable information that they would t returning to our assistance. They had fallen in with the flying enemy, and killed sixteen of them. All returned to Capt. Abbott's encampment with twenty-one horses and eighteen prisoners, having been less than two hours absent. Here Capt. Jackso