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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for N. T. Abbott or search for N. T. Abbott in all documents.

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e of the town, with two sections of Cothron's battery, which were firing upon the enemy's cavalry in the edge of the wood on our left. I received an order to advance, take the town, and hold it until further orders. Companies A and C, under Capts. Abbott and Cogswell, were deployed as skirmishers, and advanced, followed by the remainder of the regiment and the section of Best's battery, under a well-directed fire of the enemy's artillery posted in the main street, and in the full view of our nth Indiana was found near the town in line, and two sections of Cothron's battery were firing upon cavalry in the edge of a wood on the left. Lieut.-Col. Andrews, with the Second, was ordered to take the town. Deploying companies A and C (Captains Abbott and Cogswell) as skirmishers, Col. Andrews advanced with the guns, in the face of a well-directed fire from the enemy's artillery, posted in the street and in view of their cavalry. The shells burst too close to be endured, but our men's fi
that he was tied to a tree and dispatched, but this is doubted. Corporal Medley, of company F, Eleventh Wisconsin, was wounded in the arm, and brought away a wounded comrade, and then went back into the fight. Our wounded were taken to the house, and every care was taken of the sufferers which the circumstances of the case demanded, by Doctor F. N. Burke, Brigade-Surgeon of the First division, assisted by Dr. Isaac Casselbury, First Indiana cavalry, Dr. Strong, Eleventh Wisconsin, and Dr. N. T. Abbott, of the Thirty-third Illinois regiment. July 8.--The army marched to Bayou Du View. Reconnoitring parties were thrown out on all the different roads. Halting about four miles out, with General Curtis to see everything on the march in good order, we heard what we supposed was the distant report of howitzers. The deception arose from the dropping of a bucket into a well on a neighboring plantation. We encamped for the night on the side toward Clarendon. Major Bowen dashed down e
l Crane and Captain O'Brien, Third Wisconsin regiment; Captains Cary, Williams, Abbott and Goodwin, and Lieutenant Perkins, of the Second Massachusetts. These are sothe troops there engaged. I led the regiment through the wood. Company A, Captain Abbott, deployed as skirmishers, covering the advance. On emerging from the wooat the sentinels belonged to their own army. I have to lament the loss of Captains Abbott, Cary, Goodwin, and Williams, and Second Lieutenant Perkins, all of whom fand.--Smeath and Rawson, missing. killed and wounded.--Company A--Killed: Capt. Abbott, Sergt. E. B. Whitten, Corp. J. C. Bassett, privates H. C. Bright, J. Flemming those killed were Col. Crane, of the Third Wisconsin; Major Savage, and Captains Abbott, Russell, and Gooding, and Lieut. Browning, of the Second Massachusetts. Cterally murdered by a terrible fire from the gallant defenders of the work. Major Abbott sprang up on the parapet with his hat in one hand and a drawn sabre in the o
Lieutenant-Colonel Crane and Captain O'Brien, Third Wisconsin regiment; Captains Cary, Williams, Abbott and Goodwin, and Lieutenant Perkins, of the Second Massachusetts. These are some of the names tight, to support the troops there engaged. I led the regiment through the wood. Company A, Captain Abbott, deployed as skirmishers, covering the advance. On emerging from the wood, I found the enthe impression that the sentinels belonged to their own army. I have to lament the loss of Captains Abbott, Cary, Goodwin, and Williams, and Second Lieutenant Perkins, all of whom fell on the field,in the head. band.--Smeath and Rawson, missing. killed and wounded.--Company A--Killed: Capt. Abbott, Sergt. E. B. Whitten, Corp. J. C. Bassett, privates H. C. Bright, J. Flemming, L. H. Dyer, M very heavy. Among those killed were Col. Crane, of the Third Wisconsin; Major Savage, and Captains Abbott, Russell, and Gooding, and Lieut. Browning, of the Second Massachusetts. Col. Donnelly, of
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
m to first stagger, and then run in disorder to the wood in the rear, having left all of their field-officers on the ground, either killed or mortally wounded. The regiments that made this charge were the Seventh and Tenth Mississippi and Seventh Alabama. Immediately after this repulse a similar one was made on the redoubt by the Ninth and Twenty-ninth Mississippi and a battalion of sharp-shooters. They were literally murdered by a terrible fire from the gallant defenders of the work. Major Abbott sprang up on the parapet with his hat in one hand and a drawn sabre in the other, urging his men to stand to the work, until he was shot dead under the flag he so nobly defended. A braver man never fell. The flag had one hundred and forty-six bullet-holes through it, and the staff was struck eleven times. Lieut. Mason, of the Thirteenth Indiana battery, commanding the artillery, in the mean time was riddling them with grape and canister, when they broke in all directions, fleeing as fr
conflict. The rebels were estimated by captured officers and men to be eight thousand strong. Their loss will approximate five hundred killed and wounded. Among them is a colonel of a Mississippi regiment. The rebels engaged in burying the dead stated to our men that they had lost six hundred men. The story of the wounded major is probably nearest the truth, and it may be safely said that their loss will reach that number. Our loss was eight killed and twenty wounded. Among the killed is Major Abbott, of the Sixty-seventh Indiana regiment. By a person who left Munfordsville late last evening, Col. Dunham sent word that the rebel loss was over five hundred. We have taken ono hundred and ten stand of small arms and two pieces of artillery, six-pounders. Thus, upon the field made glorious by the Indianians, under Willich, have Indianians won the second battle of Munfordsville, and, in shedding lustre on the national arms, added new honors to the State from which they hail.