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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Willie Abell or search for Willie Abell in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
him as a pirate would be guilty of murder. This narration of facts, and the opinions of two disinterested and distinguished foreigners, must be conclusive to every fair mind, that to term the prisoners pirates, was an inexcusable pretext, and that the conduct of the Confederate Government was in strict accordance with the usages of civilized war, and that the desire to protect its citizens, was marked by no stain of inhumanity. Respectfully yours, Jefferson Davis, The death of Willie Abell. A Poem by Rev. Dr. J. C. Hiden. [The following appeared in the Charlottesville (Va.) Chronicle of October the 9th, 1864, and is well worthy of preservation, as handing down the name of a hero, who, though a beardless boy, was as true to country and to duty as any plumed knight who figures in the world's history.] We heard a day or two since an incident related which we think should be published, as not only illustrating a fine trait of character in our young townsman, William M. Ab
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The death of Willie Abell. (search)
The death of Willie Abell. A Poem by Rev. Dr. J. C. Hiden. [The following appeared in the Charlottesville (Va.) Chronicle of October the 9th, 1864, and is well worthy of preservation, as handing down the name of a hero, who, though a beardless boy, was as true to country and to duty as any plumed knight who figures in the world's history.] We heard a day or two since an incident related which we think should be published, as not only illustrating a fine trait of character in our young townsman, William M. Abell, who fell on the battle-field near Luray just a week ago, but as illustrating also the spirit of devotion to duty which actuates so widely all of our young men. Mr. Abell, who was acting adjutant of his regiment (Fifth Virginia Cavalry), had gone forward to reconoitre in advance of the skirmish line, and discovered that a squadron belonging to his regiment was in a position where it was about to be cut off, of which it was unconscious. He started immediately to info