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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abercrombie, John Joseph, 1802-1877 (search)
Abercrombie, John Joseph, 1802-1877 Military officer; born in Tennessee in 1802; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1822. Entering the 1st Infantry, he was its adjutant from 1825 to 1833. Serving in Florida and Mexico, he was promoted to brevet lieutenant-colonel for gallantry in the battle of Monterey, where he was severely wounded. He was commissioned lieutenant-colonel in May, 1852, and colonel in February, 1861, and was brevetted brigadier-general, U. S. A., March 13, 1865. In June following he retired. He was a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Civil War, and commanded a brigade in Patterson's division on the Upper Potomac in 1861. He was transferred to Bank's division in July. Early in 1862 he joined the Army of the Potomac, and was slightly wounded in the battle of fair Oaks (q. v.). He died in Roslyn, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradstreet, John, 1711-1774 (search)
ear he was appointed lieutenant-governor of St. Johns, New-foundland — a sinecure place. Braddock ordered him to accompany Shirley to Oswego, in 1755. as his adjutant; and in 1756 he was charged with conveying supplies to Oswego. In 1757 he was appointed captain of a company in the regiment of Royal Americans; and late in the same year he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel of the same regiment, and deputy quartermaster-general, with the rank of colonel. He was quartermaster-general of Abercrombie's forces, with the rank of colonel, in the expedition against Ticonderoga in July, 1758; and in August he led an expedition which captured Fort Frontenac. Bradstreet was with Amherst in his expedition against Ticonderoga and Crown Point in 1759. In May, 1762, he was commissioned a major-general. Pontiac's war had filled the settlements on the western frontiers with dire alarm, and they sent piteous calls for help. In July, 1764, a little army of 1,100 men, composed chiefly of provinci
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Falling waters, skirmish near. (search)
ear. Embarrassing telegraphic despatches were received by Gen. Robert Patterson, near Harper's Ferry, late in June, 1861. He was eager to advance, though Johnston had a greatly superior force. He made a reconnoissance on July 1, and on the 2d, with the permission of Scott, he put the whole army across the river at Williamsport, and pushed on in the direction of the camp of the Confederates. Near Falling Waters, 5 miles from the ford they had crossed, the advanced guard, under Col. John J. Abercrombie, which had arrived at 4 A. M., fell in with Johnston's advance, consisting of 3,500 infantry, with Pendleton's battery of field-artillery, and a large force of cavalry, under Col. J. E. B. Stuart, the whole commanded by Stonewall Jackson. Abercrombie, with a section of Perkins's battery, under Lieutenant Hudson, supported by the 1st Troop of Philadelphia cavalry, advanced to attack the foe with a warm fire of musketry. A severe conflict ensued, in which McMullen's Philadelphia I