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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adair, James, (search)
Adair, James, Author; lived among the Chickasaw and Cherokee Indians in 173575. He held the opinion and attempted to show that the American Indians were descended from the Jews. He was the author of a History of the American Indians (in which he elaborated his opinion), and of vocabularies of Indian dialects.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
ever he was, understood the public, was a man of some imagination, and knew how to combine Carver's own material with observations from previous writers; nor does he fail to mention, in the casual way of the time, authorities like Charlevoix and Adair, from whom, as we now look at things, we must say he unblushingly filches. Here is one of the examples pointed out by Professor Bourne. Charlevoix had said of the Indians in the English translation: On the smoothest grass, or the hardest for a book. He could write a long coherent letter to his first wife, and specimens of his writing are not in the hand of an ignorant man. He, not less than his assistant or assistants in publication, could have met with the works of Charlevoix, Adair, and Lahontan in London book-stalls. But it was hardly his pen that made reference to Plato and Grotius. The volume is dedicated To Joseph Banks, President of the Royal Society. Then follows, in the second edition, a magniloquent Address to
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Index. This index covers only the text. To find the bibliography for a given author observe the chapter in which his name occurs and then consult the proper section in the Bibliographies. A Abaellino, 219, 231 Absalom and Achitophel, 158-159 Accidence or the path-way to experience, an, 17 Account of the European settlements, 212 Account of the New invented Pennsylvanian fire places, an, 96 Achilles, 268 Adair, James, 193 Adams, Charles, 220 Adams, John, 91, 125, 129, 131, 137-138, 144, 146, 147, 172 Adams, Rev., John, 160-161 Adams, Samuel, 30, 132, 144 Adams and liberty, 179 Addison, 94, 109, I12, 113, 1x6, l18, 159, 233, 234, 237, 238, 244, 254, 256 Address to the Freemen of South Carolina, an, 148 Address to the House of burgesses, 142 Address to the people of the state of New York, an (John Jay), 148 Address to the people of the state of New York (Melancthon Smith), 148 Address to the Supreme being, 161 Ad Thamesin, 3 A
Some details of the fight. We are indebted to Mr. Wm. H. Pritchard, the General Telegraphic News Agent of the Southern Press, for the following statement: Messrs. Maguire and Adair gave us the following statement of the killed and wounded of their company (the Atlanta Ga., Grays,) in the fight on Sunday last at Bull's Run, near Manassas. The killed were two men by the name of Hammond, Isaac Frank, Smith Martin, Anderson Orr, James George, James Kershaw, W. W. Brooks, Joel Yarborough, Robert Hamilton, and George Grambling. Wounded. J. B. Martin, hip, slightly. Lieut. Hulsey, severely. Benjamin Watkins, arm. James Adair, flesh wound in left arm. John Grambling, in band, very slightly. Tonsy Henderson, arm, slightly. Mr. Christian was severely bruised by a wagon passing over him. Wm. Harris, in the leg, slightly. Dave Croft, wounded slightly in the body, head and foot. Mr. Holtaclaw, in the arm. Jerry Cannant, slightly hurt. Lieut. Smith, da
Cumberland.--Valentine Parish, Ambrose Ford and John W. Wilson. Dinwiddie.--Thomas B. Hamlin, W. M. Gill and William Young. Essex.--Thomas Croxton, Leonard P. Sale and Muscoe Garrett. Fayette.--Edward B. Bailey, Hudson M. Dickinson and James Montgomery. Floyd.--Bayant Hylton, Noah B. Moore and Thomas W. Williamson. Franklin.--James S. Calloway, Thomas Dudley, sr., and Frederick R. Browne. Frederick.--Washington G. Singleton, Colonel R. J. Glass and J. Carr Baker. Giles.--James Adair, Tobias Miller and Samuel Kinsey. Goochland.--Walter D. Leake, A. M. Hamilton and Thomas Taylor. Grayson.--John Dickinson, Haston Fulton and William C. Parks. Greenbrier.--James W. Davis, Austin Handley and Charles L. Peyton. Greene.--William F. Plunkett, Edwin Booton and Benjamin Herndon. Greenesville.--Robert Cato, B. R. Wilson and Henry Spratley. Halifax.--John R. Edmunds, Thomas S. Flournoy and Beverly Sydnor. Hanover.--Edmund Winston, Edward Shelton and William J.