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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 8 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 12: voices of the night (search)
e stars from their eyries Look down through the ebon night air, Where the groves by the Ouphantic Fairies Lit up for my Lily Adair, For my child-like Lily Adair, For my heaven-born Lily Adair, For my beautiful, dutiful Lily Adair. It is easy to gLily Adair, For my heaven-born Lily Adair, For my beautiful, dutiful Lily Adair. It is easy to guess that Longfellow, in his North American Review article, drew from Dr. Chivers and his kin his picture of those writers, turgid and extravagant, to be found in American literature. He farther says of them: Instead of ideas, they give us merely thLily Adair, For my beautiful, dutiful Lily Adair. It is easy to guess that Longfellow, in his North American Review article, drew from Dr. Chivers and his kin his picture of those writers, turgid and extravagant, to be found in American literature. He farther says of them: Instead of ideas, they give us merely the signs of ideas. They erect a great bridge of words, pompous and imposing, where there is hardly a drop of thought to trickle beneath. Is not he who thus apostrophizes the clouds, Ye posters of the wakeless air! quite as extravagant as the SpanLily Adair. It is easy to guess that Longfellow, in his North American Review article, drew from Dr. Chivers and his kin his picture of those writers, turgid and extravagant, to be found in American literature. He farther says of them: Instead of ideas, they give us merely the signs of ideas. They erect a great bridge of words, pompous and imposing, where there is hardly a drop of thought to trickle beneath. Is not he who thus apostrophizes the clouds, Ye posters of the wakeless air! quite as extravagant as the Spanish poet, who calls a star a burning doubloon of the celestial bank ? North American Review, XXXIV. 75. It is a curious fact that this exuberant poet Chivers claimed a certain sympathy Passages from the Correspondence of Rufus W. Griswold, p. 46