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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 2 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 14 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 12 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 12 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 12 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1865., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 8 0 Browse Search
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s about certain matters, and they are not, by any means, complimentary to the white man. He says: It jis' ‘pears to me dat Adam was a black man, sah, an‘ de Lord he scar him till he got white, cos he was a sinner, sah. Tom, you scoundrel, how darethat way? ‘Pears to me dat way; hab to tell de truf, sah; dat's my min‘. Men was ‘riginally black; but de Lord he scare Adam till he got white; dat's de reasonable supposition, sah. Do a man's har git black when he scared, sah? No, sah, it gits we Lord he rode into de garden in chariot of fire, sah, robed wid de lightnin‘, sah, thunder bolt in his han‘, an‘ he cried Adam, in de voice of a airthquake, sah, an‘ de ‘fee on Adam was powerful, sah. Dat's my min‘, sah. And so Tom goes on his way,Adam was powerful, sah. Dat's my min‘, sah. And so Tom goes on his way, confident that the first man was black, and that another white man has been vanquished in argument. August, 13 The weather continues oppressively hot. The names of candidates for admission to the corps d'afrique continue to
eneral Hardee, and give him all the particulars. (Handing him a note addressed to Hardee.) I was thereupon placed on a stolen horse, and conducted to General Hardee. On my way from Bragg'sto Hardee's quarters, my mind was busied with singular fancies. I thought of rebel treachery and oppression; I thought of the arch-conspirators at Montgomery, the disgraceful bombardment of Sumpter, the murder of United States troops in the streets of Baltimore, the enslavement of four millions of Adam's race, all by the hateful power that now had me in its clutches. These atrocities made me the more willing to suffer in the defense of the Government that I had volunteered to serve. Hardee is a noble-looking man, and on this occasion was dressed in full uniform of blue cloth. General, said my conductor, here is a Yankee officer, referred to you by General Bragg. For what purpose? asked the General. For examination, sir. The General, with a look of surprise and indignatio
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 8: (search)
g. We were being led in a way we knew not: and like the humble woman of the cottage, we even made merry over our inevitable privations and inconveniences. Indeed, we grew so accustomed to them that they scarcely seemed privations. While hemmed in on all sides by the blockade, we used to think that if no war were raging, and a wall as thick and high as the great Chinese Wall were to entirely surround our Confederacy, we should not suffer intolerable inconvenience, but live as happily as Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden before they tasted the forbidden fruit. We used to say, How can we be subdued, when we have so cheerfully and uncomplainingly given up every luxury, and in a measure even the comforts of life; and yet with what crude resources are at hand, we are feeding and clothing the whole people of the South, civil as well as military? We felt all the more pride, when we remembered that at the beginning of hostilities we were unprepared in almost every essential necessary
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xl. (search)
with his guests. In a few minutes the maiden entered, bearing a large waiter, containing several glass tumblers, and a large pitcher in the midst, and placed it upon the centre-table. Mr. Lincoln arose, and gravely addressing the company, said: Gentlemen, we must pledge our mutual healths in the most healthy beverage which God has given to man — it is the only beverage I have ever used or allowed in my family, and I cannot conscientiously depart from it on the present occasion — it is pure Adam's ale from the spring; and, taking a tumbler, he touched it to his lips, and pledged them his highest respects in a cup of cold water. Of course, all his guests were constrained to admire his consistency, and to join in his example. Mr. R., when he went to Chicago, had but little political sympathy with the Republican Convention which nominated Mr. Lincoln; but when he saw, as he did see for himself, his sturdy adherence to a high moral principle, he returned an admirer of the man, and a
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, LXXIX. (search)
row of a hill; his face was long, sallow, and cadaverous, shrunk, shrivelled, wrinkled, and dry, having here and there a hair on the surface; his cheeks were leathery; his ears were large, and ran out almost at right angles from his head, caused partly by heavy hats and partly by nature; his lower lip was thick, hanging, and undercurved, while his chin reached for the lip upcurved; his neck was neat and trim, his head being well balanced on it; there was the lone mole on the right cheek, and Adam's apple on his throat. Thus stood, walked, acted, and looked Abraham Lincoln. He was not a pretty man by any means, nor was he an ugly one; he was a homely man, careless of his looks, plain-looking and plain-acting. He had no pomp, display, or dignity, so-called. He appeared simple in his carriage and bearing. He was a sad-looking man; his melancholy dripped from him as he walked. His apparent gloom impressed his friends, and created a sympathy for him, -one means of his great succes
uce it here from the manuscript furnished me by Mrs. Crawford. The author and composer called it Adam and eve's wedding song. When Adam was created He dwelt in Eden's shade, As Moses has recordedAdam was created He dwelt in Eden's shade, As Moses has recorded, And soon a bride was made. Ten thousand times ten thousand Of creatures swarmed around Before a bride was formed, And yet no mate was found. The Lord then was not willing That man should be alone,stead thereof, And then he took the same And of it made a woman, And brought her to the man. Then Adam he rejoiced To see his loving bride A part of his own body, The product of his side. The woman was not taken From Adam's feet we see, So he must not abuse her, The meaning seems to be. The woman was not taken From Adam's head, we know, To show she must not rule him-- 'Tis evidently so. The woman she was taken From under Adam's arm, So she must be protected From injuries and harm. Poor Sarah, at whose wedding this song was sung, never lived to see the glory nor share in the honor that af
ows cropped out like a huge rock on the brow of a hill; his long, sallow face was wrinkled and dry, with a hair here and there on the surface; his cheeks were leathery; his ears were large, and ran out almost at right angles from his head, caused partly by heavy hats and partly by nature; his lower lip was thick, hanging, and undercurved, while his chin reached for the lip upcurved; his neck was neat and trim, his head being well balanced on it; there was the lone mole on the right cheek, and Adam's apple on his throat. Thus stood, walked, acted, and looked Abraham Lincoln. He was not a pretty man by any means, nor was he an ugly one; he was a homely man, careless of his looks, plain-looking and plain-acting. He had no pomp, display, or dignity, so-called. He appeared simple in his carriage and bearing. He was a sad-looking man; his melancholy dripped from him as he walked. His apparent gloom impressed his friends, Lincoln's melancholy never failed to impress any man who e
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 21: Mr. Davis's first session in Congress. (search)
either tailor or blacksmith was present. Mr. Sawyer, while avowing himself a blacksmith, was good-natured enough in his retort. This controversy was renewed the next day by Andrew Johnson. Vaunting himself upon being a mechanic, with a slur upon an illegitimate, swaggering, bastard, scrub aristocracy, he declared that when a blow was struck upon that class, either direct or by innuendo, from Whig or Democrat, he would resent it. He summoned all history, sacred and profane, beginning with Adam, who (he said) was a tailor, to do honor to his class of mechanics. Mr. Davis had named two of the trades of civil life, he said, but in doing so he had no desire to attack any particular class. His opinion was simply that war, like other knowledge, must be acquired. Nothing was more manifest throughout this debate than the courtesy of one party to it, unless it was the demagogism of the other. From this debate arose all Mr. Johnson's subsequent animosity against Mr. Davis. When Mr
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 22: the secret service fund--charges against Webster, 1845-46. (search)
of Dante and Virgil, and I remember the key they gave me to their tastes and temperamental divergence. Mr. Dallas said Wordsworth was the poet of nature, and Mr. Ingersoll remarked that he bore the same relation to cultivated poetic manhood that Adam did to Goethe, and who would hesitate for a moment which to choose if granted a day with either. Mr. Dallas immediately announced a preference for Adam, and insisted that a mind fresh from the storehouse of the Supreme Source of all knowledge muAdam, and insisted that a mind fresh from the storehouse of the Supreme Source of all knowledge must have developed many godlike facts instead of immature theories, etc. They whetted their wits upon each other for some time until I ventured the remark that, whether by sin and sorrow, or observation of natural forces, I felt that, as man progressed, he became more interesting, whereupon Mr. Ingersoll laughingly said, You see Mrs. Davis agrees with me that Cain was more aggressive, and therefore more attractive than Abel, and the ladies in the Land of Nod clearly were more agreeable than those
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
ngly posted in two lines of battle supported by numerous batteries. One of his lines had the protection of the railroad cut, forming an excellent breastwork. We had no artillery, the nature of the ground forbidding its use. It was deemed reckless to attack with the force present. Night was now approaching. Presently the remainder of Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps came up on the left, and with McCown's command and a part of Cheatham's prolonged the line of battle in that direction. Adam's brigade also appeared and formed on the right of Preston. The troops bivouaced in position. The Commanding-General expecting an attack upon his right the next morning, ordered me during the night, to recross the river with Palmer's brigade. Before daylight Thursday morning Palmer was in position on the right of Hanson. No general engagement occurred on this day, the troops generally being employed in replenishing the ammunition, cooking rations, and obtaining some repose. On Friday
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