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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 55 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 21 5 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 22, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 7 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 2 Browse Search
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ded about the crossing of Snake Creek. The battle was renewed by Gladden's gallant brigade, now commanded by Colonel Daniel W. Adams. Adams took it in with his usual mettle. There was a fierce wrestle; but it was the beating of the wave againsAdams took it in with his usual mettle. There was a fierce wrestle; but it was the beating of the wave against the rock. The Confederates wilted under the scathing sheet of flame, faltered, and fell back. Jackson, too, was hammering upon this part of the line; and Chalmers, joining in the onset, turned their flank. At this critical moment, Adams seized Adams seized the colors of the First Louisiana, and led his men in a desperate and successful charge. The enemy, whose flank had been turned farther to their left, fell back, but in good order. Adams, according to his wont, was wounded; and Colonel Deas took cAdams, according to his wont, was wounded; and Colonel Deas took command of the brigade. And now both armies were in the tumult of mortal endeavor. The Confederate assaults were made by rapid and often unconnected charges along the line. They were repeatedly checked, and often repulsed, by the stubborn resis
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
ern pride to take for granted that superior numbers alone effected the result. Yet, in the great wars of the world, nothing is so little proved as that the more numerous always and necessarily prevail. On the contrary, the facts of history show that brains have ever been more potent than brawn. The career of the Confederate States exhibits no exception to this rule. Eliminate the good sense and unselfish earnestness of Mr. Lincoln, and the great ability and practical energy of Seward and Adams, and of Stanton and Chase from the control of, the affairs of the United States; conceive a management of third-rate and incompetent men in their places — will any one doubt that matters would have ended differently? To many it may be unpalatable to hear that at the South all was not done that might have been done and that cardinal blunders were made. But what is pleasing is not always true, and there can be no good excuse now for suppressing important facts or perverting history. The tim
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 8.25 (search)
t, saying that he was retreating from Warrensburg, 34 miles distant, and that the rebel General Price was in full pursuit with an army of 10,000 men. A few hours later Colonel Peabody joined us. There were then at this post the Irish Brigade, Colonel Marshall's Illinois cavalry regiment (full), Colonel Peabody's regiment, and a part of the 14th Missouri--in all about 2780 men, with one six-pounder, Doubtless an accidental mistake. Colonel Mulligan had 7 six-pounders (Waldschmidt, 2; Adams, 3, and Pirner, 2); Pirner also had 2 brass mortars for throwing six-inch spherical shells, of which he had but 40, which were soon exhausted. The Confederate artillery consisted of 16 guns in five batteries, as follows: Bledsoe, 4 guns; Churchill Clark,2; Guibor, 4; Kelly, 4; Kneisley, 2.-( History of Lafayette county, Missouri. ) The lack of agreement between the numbers of the Union forces as here stated, and as given by Colonel Snead on page 273, is accounted for by the latter on th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Shiloh. (search)
Wm. H. Ketchum. Brigade loss: k, 89; w, 336; m, 169= 594. Cavalry: Ala. Battalion, Capt. T. F. Jenkins. Cavalry loss, k, 2; w, 6; m, 1 = 9. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Jones M. Withers. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. H. Gladden (m w), Col. Daniel W. Adams (w), Col. Z. C. Deas (w): 21st Ala., Lieut.-Col. S. W. Cayce, Maj. F. Stewart; 22d Ala., Col. Z. C. Deas, Lieut.-Col. John C. Marrast; 25th Ala., Col. J. Q. Loomis (w), Maj. George D. Johnston; 26th Ala., Col. J. G. Coltart (w), Lieut.-Col. William D. Chadick; 1st La., Col. Daniel W. Adams, Maj. F. H. Farrar, Jr.; Ala. Battery, Capt. F. H. Robertson. Brigade loss: k, 129; w, 597; in, 103 = 829. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James R. Chalmers: 5th Miss., Col. A. E. Fant; 7th Miss., Lieut.-Col. H. Mayson; 9th Miss., Lieut.-Col. William A. Rankin (m w); 10th Miss., Col. R. A. Smith; 52d Tenn., Col. B. J. Lea; Ala. Battery, Capt. Charles P. Gage. Brigade loss: k, 83; w, 343; m, 19= 445. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John K. Jackson: 17th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
ried at least one encampment. In the same quarter of the field all of Withers's division, including Gladden's brigade, reinforced by Breckinridge's whole reserve, soon became engaged, and Prentiss's entire line, though fighting stoutly, was pressed back in confusion. We early lost the services of the gallant Gladden, a man of soldierly aptitudes and experience, who, after a marked influence upon the issue in his quarter of the field, fell mortally wounded. His immediate successor, Colonel D. W. Adams, was also soon seriously disabled. Meantime, on our left (Federal right) Ruggles's division of Bragg's corps was so strenuously pressing the two brigades of Sherman's division, that at the moment McClernand's division came up, Sherman was giving way with the loss of five or six guns. McClernand could not stay the retrograde, and the Federal right was forced back to the line of the road from Purdy to Hamburg. There a foothold was gained on a thickly wooded ridge, with a ravine in fr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Perryville, Ky., October 8th, 1862. (search)
The dash indicates that the name of the commanding officer has not been found in the Official Records.--editors. 4th Tenn.,----; 8th Tex.,----. Brigade loss (not separately reported). left wing, Maj.-Gen. William J. Hardee. Second division, Brig.-Gen. J. Patton Anderson. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Brown (w), Col. William Miller: 1st Fla., Col. William Miller; 3d Fla.,----; 41st Miss.,----; Palmer's Battery,----. Brigade loss (not separately reported). Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Daniel W. Adams: 13th La., Col. R. L. Gibson; 16th La., Col. D. C. Gober; 20th La., Col. Aug. Reichard, Lieut.-Col. Leon von Zinken; 25th La., Col. S. W. Fisk; 14th Battalion La. Sharp-shooters, Major J. E. Austin; 5th Co. Washington (La.) Art'y, Capt. C. H. Slocomb. Brigade loss: k, 6; w, 78; m, 68 = 152. Third Brigade, Col. Samuel Powell: 45th Ala.,----; 1st Ark.,----; 24th Miss., Col. William F. Dowd; 29th Tenn.,----; Mo. Battery, Capt. Overton W. Barret. Brigade loss (not separately reported
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
Morgan; 30th Miss., Lieut.-Col. J. I. Scales; 39th N. C., Capt. A. W. Bell; Mo. Battery, Capt. O. W. Barret. Brigade loss: k, 130; w, 620; m, 13 = 763. Fourth Brigade, Col. A. M. Manigault: 24th Ala.,----; 28th Ala.,----; 34th Ala.,----; 10th and 19th S. C., Col. A. J. Lythgoe (k); Ala. Battery, Capt. D. D. Waters. Brigade loss: k, 73; w, 428; m, 16 = 517. Hardee's Corps, Lieut.-Gen. William J. Hardee. First division, Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen.-: Daniel W. Adams (w), Col. Randall L. Gibson: 32d Ala., Lieut.-Col. Henry Maury (wa, Col. Alexander McKinstry; 13th and 20th La., Col. Randall L. Gibson, Maj. Charles Guillet; 16th and 25th La., Col. S. W. Fisk (k), Maj. F. C. Zacharie; 14th La. Battalion, Maj. J. E. Austin; 5th Battery Washington (La.) Art'y, Lieut. W. C. D. Vaught. Brigade loss: k, 112; w, 445; m, 146 = 703. Second Brigade, Col. J. B. Palmer, Brig.-Gen. Gideon J. Pillow: 18th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. W. R. Butler, Col. J. B. Palmer (w); 26
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
nry C. Semple, Lieut. R. W. Goldthwaite. Breckinridge's division, Maj.-Gen. J. C. Breckinridge. Helm's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Benjamin H. Helm (k), Col. J. H. Lewis: 41st Ala., Col. M. L. Stansel; 2d Ky., Col. J. W. Hewitt (k), Lieut.-Col. J. W. Moss; 4th Ky., Col. Joseph P. Nuckols, Jr. (w), Maj. T. W. Thompson; 6th Ky., Col. J. H. Lewis, Lieut.-Col. M. H. Cofer; 9th Ky., Col. J. W. Caldwell (w), Lieut.-Col. J. C. Wickliffe. Brigade loss: k, 63; w, 408 == 471. Adams's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Daniel W. Adams (w and c), Col. R. L. Gibson: 32d Ala., Maj. J. C. Kimbell; 13th and 20th La., Col. R. L. Gibson, Col. Leon von Zinken, Capt. E. M. Dubroca; 16th and 25th La., Col. D. Gober; 19th La., Lieut.-Col. R. W. Turner (w), Maj. L. Butler (k), Capt. H. A. Kennedy; 14th La. Battalion, Maj. J. E. Austin. Brigade loss: k, w and m == 429. Stovall's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. M. A. Stovall: 1st and 3d Fla., Col. W. S. Dilworth; 4th Fla., Col. W. L. L. Bowen; 47th Ga., Capt. William S. Phillips (w), Ca
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
. Alexander: 5th Iowa, Col. J. Morris Young; 1st Ohio, Col. Beroth B. Eggleston; 7th Ohio, Col. Israel Garrard. Artillery: I, 1st U. S., Lieut. George B. Rodney. The effective strength of the foregoing commands was about 13,000. The loss in action aggregated 99 killed, 598 wounded, and 28 missing=725. the Confederate forces. Cavalry Corps, Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana.--Lieut.-Gen. N. B. Forrest. Chalmers's division, Brig.-Gen. James R. Chalmers. (Composed of the brigades of Brig.-Gens. Frank C. Armstrong, Wirt Adams, and Peter B. Starke.) Jackson's division, Brig.-Gen. William H. Jackson. (Composed of the brigades of Brig.-Gens. Tyree H. Bell and Alexander W. Campbell.) Roddey's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Philip D. Roddey. Crossland's Brigade, Col. Ed. Crossland. There were also some militia and other forces under Major-Generals Howell Cobb and G. W. Smith, and Brigadier-Generals Felix H. Robertson, Daniel W. Adams, and R. C. Tyler and others.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
oss from Long's division was 40 killed, 260 wounded, and seven missing. General Long was wounded in the head, Colonels [A. O.] Miller and [C. C.] McCormick in the leg, and [Lieutenant] Colonel [Jonathan] Briggs in the breast. . . . The immediate fruits of our victory were 31 field-guns and one 30-pounder Parrott, which had been used against us; 2700 prisoners, including 150 officers; a number of colors, and immense quantities of stores of every kind. Generals Forrest, Armstrong, Roddey, and Adams escaped, with a number of men, under cover of darkness, either by the Burnsville and River roads, or by swimming the Alabama River. A portion of Upton's division pursued on the Burnsville road until long after midnight, capturing four guns and many prisoners. I estimate the entire garrison, including the militia of the city and surrounding country, at 7000 men; the entire force under my command, engaged and in supporting distance, was 9000 men and eight guns. General Upton's division w
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