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Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 73 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 3 Browse Search
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owever, still hope that the love and spirit of liberty are not yet extinct in Kentucky. General Johnston now addressed himself to the reorganization of his army, which is given in Special Order No. 51, issued at Bowling Green, October 28, 1861. It is given in full, as it not only exhibits something of the personnel of its officers, but assists in a verification of the strength of the army, and will elucidate its movements: first division. Major-General Hardee, commanding. Cavalry. Adams's regiment and Phifer's battalion. Artillery. Swett's, Twigg's Hubbard's, and Byrne's batteries. Infantry. First Brigade.-Brigadier-General Hindman, commanding. Second Arkansas Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Bocage. Second Arkansas Regiment, Colonel A. T. Hawthorne. Arkansas Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Marmaduke. Second Brigade.-Colonel P. R. Cleburne, commanding. First Arkansas Regiment, Colonel Cleburne. Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel D. C. Cross. Seventh Mississippi Regiment, Colonel
laski. It was adopted so as to enable the Confederate army to intercept and give battle to Buell, in case he should advance by any of these three roads. The movement was covered by a cloud of cavalry, Helm's First Kentucky, Scott's Louisiana, Wirt Adams's Mississippi, and by Forrest's and Morgan's commands, who were bold and energetic in harassing the enemy. The incessant rains, varying from a drizzle to a torrent, flooded the roads, washed away bridges, and made encampment almost intolerablensville; Cleburne's brigade, Hardee's division, except regiment, at Burnsville; and Carroll's brigade, Crittenden's division, and Helm's cavalry, at Tuscumbia; Bowen's brigade at Cortland; Breckinridge's brigade, here; the regiments of cavalry of Adams and Wharton, on the opposite bank of the river; Scott's Louisiana regiment at Pulaski, sending forward supplies; Morgan's cavalry at Shelbyville, ordered on. To-morrow, Breckinridge's brigade will go to Corinth; then Bowen's. When these pass
eir lines, but they again formed at the base of the hill, and routed the camp in fine style. I was then sent for General Chalmers, who received orders to push up the road and sweep down the river, to where we heard a heavy firing, supported by Wirt Adams's regiment. While Jackson's brigade was attacking McClernand's left flank, and Hindman his right, Anderson's brigade had got in on Hindman's left, and Gibson's brigade was trailing at his heels, adding to the momentum of the column. Indeedmy had begun to march, on the very verge of the ridges overlooking Pittsburg Landing. He was in the act of swinging his troops round on his left as a pivot. A brigade under Colonel (afterward Major-General) Chalmers, flanked by a battalion of Wirt Adams's cavalry, constituted the extreme right. We sat on our horses, side by side, watching that brigade as it swept over the ridge; and, as the colors dipped out of sight, the general said to me, That checkmates them. I told him I was glad to hea
ack slowly to Mickey's, about three miles, carrying off the wounded and many spoils. It remained at Mickey's, where there was a large hospital, three days, burying the dead, removing the wounded, and sending back to Corinth its captures. On Friday, Breckinridge marched the rear-guard into Corinth. The only attempt to follow up the victory was on Tuesday. The rear-guard was covered by about 350 cavalry. Colonel Forrest was the senior officer. He had 150 men of his own; a company of Wirt Adams's regiment, under Captain Isaac F. Harrison; a-squadron of Wharton's Texas Rangers; and John Morgan, with some of his men. Sherman advanced with two brigades and the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, and, receiving the support of a column from General Wood, proceeded cautiously on a reconnaissance. Marching with Hildebrand's unfortunate Third Brigade in front, he came upon Forrest's cavalry command. He at once threw out the Seventy-seventh Ohio Regiment, supported by the Fourth Illinois Caval
rmy corps, numerically greater than his whole available force in the field; that the enemy had at least an equal force to the south, on my right flank, which would be nearer Vicksburg than myself in case I should make the movement proposed. I had, moreover, positive information that he was daily increasing his strength. I also learned, on reaching Edward's Depot, that one division of the enemy (A. J. Smith's) was at or near Dillon's. On the morning of the 16th, about 6.30 o'clock, Colonel Wirt Adams, commanding the cavalry, reported to General Pemberton that his pickets were skirmishing with the enemy on the Raymond road, in our front. At the same moment a courier arrived and delivered the following despatch from General Johnston: Canton Road, Ten Miles from Jackson, May 15, 1863, 8.30 A. M. Our being compelled to leave Jackson makes your plan impracticable. The only mode by which we can unite is by your moving directly to Clinton and informing me, that we may move to that
isplayed. Joseph Wheeler, the young Murat of the cavalry, General Lawton and his no less distinguished brother-in-law, E. Porter Alexander, the skilful engineer and accomplished artillery officer, for gallantry promoted to be Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery of Longstreet's Corps; and Hardee, the scientific dauntless soldier; Walker, David R. Jones, Young, Denning, Colquitt, and a shining list I have not space to name. Mississippi gave her Ferguson, Barksdale, Martin, the two Adams, Featherston, Posey, and Fizer, who led an army on the ramparts of Knoxville but left his arm there, and a host of gallant men. Alabama sent us Deas, Law, Gracie, and James Longstreet, dubbed by Lee upon the field of Sharpsburg his old war horse, a stubborn fighter, who held the centre there with a scant force and a single battery of artillery; the gallant Twenty-seventh regiment of North Carolina troops, under Colonel Cooke, stood as support, without ammunition, but with flags waving t
moon, however, afforded but slight concealment to their movements, and in one of the trips, Lieutenant Davis in command, a schooner full of soldiers and baggage passed directly under the bow of the guard-boat Nina. The officer who made the statement expressed himself to be ignorant whether the watch on board the Nina discovered the movement or not; at all events, he said, they did not signify any cognizance of the fact.--(Doc. 8.)--Charleston Mercury, Dec. 28; Mess. Barnwell, Orr, and Adams, the Commissioners appointed by South Carolina to treat with the Federal Government, arrived in Washington to-day. This evening they have held a consultation with a few friends, among whom was Senator Wigfall, of Texas.--Boston Post. Dec. 27. In the Convention at Charleston, Mr. Rhett offered the following ordinance: First.--That the Conventions of the seceding slaveholding States of the United States unite with South Carolina., land hold a Convention at Montgomery, Ala., for the p
uccess, was the impetuous feeling to go ahead and fight. In order to get within the enemy's lines, a long march was necessary to this end. From two o'clock A. M. until ten they marched; and even then the men were unable to rest. To this fact alone, the officers of this regiment attribute, in a great measure, the reverse. The regiment acted as part of the reserve, and did not get into battle till late in the day.--Philadelphia Bulletin, August 5. A meeting was held this evening in Rev. Dr. Adams' Church, on Madison-square, New York city, to aid in measures taken for the prevention and suppression of intemperance in the National Army. A. R. Wetmore, Esq., presided, and Dr. De Witt offered a prayer. Resolutions were read by Dr. Marsh, which were responded to in an able speech by Rev. Mr. Willets, of Brooklyn, and Paymaster Bingham, of the Twenty-sixth Regiment.--(Doc. 162.) Admiral Sir Alexander Milne, Commander-in-Chief of the British forces, at Halifax, in a private lette
visions: the first, including the Valley, under General Doren; second, G. W. Smith; third, General Longstreet; fourth, General Kirby Smith. A meeting of German citizens was held at Chicago, Ill., at which speeches were made by Caspar Butz and others, and resolutions sustaining the action of General Fremont were adopted.--(Doc. 142.) At the Lord Mayor's dinner in London, England, the Chief Magistrate of that city proposed the Foreign ambassadors, coupling the same with the name of Mr. Adams, the American Minister. That gentleman in his reply, stated that his mission was to promote and perpetuate the friendly relations of the two countries. Lord Palmerston said, although circumstances may, for a time, threaten to interfere with the supply of cotton, the temporary evil will be productive of permanent good. England would find in various portions of the globe a sure and ample supply, which would render her no more dependent. He stated that the country witnessed with afflictio
One of their correspondents left for the camp of General Banks, and afterward wrote that he had seen fifty of General Jackson's wagons unloading boats, preparatory to crossing the river. The diplomatic correspondence between the governments of France and England on the one hand, and that of the United States on the other, concerning the question of international law involved in the seizure of Messrs. Mason and Slidell, was made public. The first document is a note from Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams, in which the case is briefly mentioned, and in which Mr. Seward says that the action of Capt. Wilkes was without any instructions from the Government, and he trusted that the British Government would consider the subject in a friendly temper. Then follows a note from Earl Russell to Lord Lyons, dated November 30, reciting the English version of the case — declaring that the act of Captain Wilkes was an affront to the British flag, and a violation of international law; and announcing that
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