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Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 73 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Wirt Adams or search for Wirt Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 7 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
Osgood, ordinary seaman; Thos. Baine, ordinary seaman; Benjamin Harper, seaman; Wm. Clark, boy; Charles Schaffer, seaman; Frank Still well, nurse; George Walker, landsman; John C. Scott, ordinary seaman; Thomas Wilde, ordinary seaman; Wm. Smith, boy; Wm. Andrews, captain after-guard; Frederick Munsell, captain after-guard; Lewis McLane, landsman; Peter Duncan, landsman;----Smith, fireman; Thomas Baines, fireman; Thomas Stanton, fireman;----Cannel, fireman. Total, nineteen. Wounded--Lieutenant Adams, slightly; Acting Third Assistant-Engineer McEwan, amputation arm; Acting Master's Mate R. P. Herrick, slightly; Acting Ensign W. H. Heginbotham, severely, (since dead;) Wilder Venner, landsman, leg; Adolphus Pulle, seaman, severe flesh wounds, legs; Hiram Elder, seaman, right leg; R. Dumphery, coal-heaver, both arms; Wm. Thompson, ordinary seaman, one leg; E. Johnson, boy, contusion, side; Walter Lloyd, boy, leg; M. Forbes, captain mizzen-top, contusion, side; Wm. Stanley, seaman, cont
brigade from any escape, except by swimming. Our extreme right being thrown back, the brave Colonel Godwin, although surrounded on all sides, except on the river-side, still fought on, and when compelled to yield ground to overwhelming odds, fell back with a force of about seventy-five men, still returning the enemy's fire, and refused to surrender until fighting was useless. Lieutenant-Colonel Tate and Major York, Captains McPherson and Ray, and Lieutenant Mebane, of the Sixth, with Captain Adams, of the staff, broke away, and escaped over the bridge in the darkness. Lieutenants Williams, Smith, and Fitzgerald, of the Fifty-fourth; Brown, of the Sixth, with a few others, plunged into the river and swam safely over; but, unfortunately, some others were drowned. Lieutenant-Colonel H. Jones, Jr., of the Fifty-seventh, and Captain White, of the Sixth, plunged in to swim, but the coldness of the water compelled them to put back. The casualties of our brigade are small in killed a
nd Forrest, estimated at five thousand cavalry and mounted infantry. Yesterday afternoon they were in line of battle, and skirmishing with Sanders till dark. Colonel Adams, with the First Kentucky and Forty-fifth Ohio, distinguished himself by the most gallant and daring conduct throughout, and to-day followed the retreating rebenth Kentucky in the morning, and stripping them completely, were arrayed in their uniform. Seeing them at the edge of a wood, and mistaking them for the Eleventh, Adams pushed a charge quite into the body of the rebel forces, and just as the First Kentucky had raised their caps to cheer their friends, as they supposed, the miscreants opened a terrific fire upon them. Indignant, surprised, and surrounded, there was nothing left but speed, and the wonder is how so many escaped. Adams, who, by the way, has always been the brains and right hand of Woolford's cavalry, declares that he will never believe another rebel, will take no more prisoners, and intends t
and that others would go to France, to purchase arms, and this fact was communicated to the British Foreign Office, which interposed no objection. Yet, in October of the same year, Earl Russell entertained the complaint of the United States Minister in London, that the confederate States were importing contraband of war from the island of Nassau, directed inquiry into the matter, and obtained a report from the authorities of the island denying the allegations, which report was inclosed to Mr. Adams, and received by him as satisfactory evidence to dissipate suspicion naturally thrown upon the authorities of Nassau by that unwarrantable act. So, too, when the confederate government purchased in Great Britain, as a neutral country, (and with strict observance both of the law of nations and the municipal law of Great Britain,) vessels which were subsequently armed and commissioned as vessels of war, after they had been far removed from British waters, the British government, in violation
Doc. 119.-General Wirt Adams's expedition. Natchez, Miss., December 11, 1863. Mr. Editor: It has been so long since you have had any warlike news from this military division, that you and the country have probably regarded this, the garden of Dixie, as neutral ground, and but for the restless spirits that are now in command of our forces, we would in all probability have sunk into the quiet and obscurity of good old Union times. Our military commanders appear to have also, taken thisutterings of a coming storm aroused us from our fancied security. A couple of scouts, captured by Colonel Farrar, Thirtieth Missouri, told of a secret expedition then on the move from Clinton, in a southerly direction. Three days after, General Wirt Adams, with a cavalry command of two thousand five hundred men and ten pieces of artillery, passed through Washington, seven miles out, moving to the south of Natchez, as was reported. Colonel Farrar was sent out with a mounted force of fifty me
. infantry under the command of Generals Loring and French, and five thousand cavalry, under the command of S. D. Lee, Wirt Adams, and Ferguson. In an advantageous position this force, if concentrated, might perhaps have made a stand and caused us d by Captain John Foster, accompanied the expedition, and on the morning of the fourth, Foster's advance-guard was met by Adams's rebel cavalry, at Champion Hills, who charged upon our small force, running over them, and taking seven prisoners. Thei enemy, and routed him with considerable loss. Their forces, consisting of about seven thousand men, commanded by Generals Wirt Adams, Ross, and Ferguson, and the whole under command of General S. D. Lee, then fell back to a commanding position on g out; arrived at Canton on the twenty-sixth, where it remained several days. Colonel Winslow had a severe skirmish with Adams's forces on the twenty-seventh, and on the twenty-ninth the same rebel force attacked and captured a forage-train of sixt
This Northern Mississippi raid, it seems, consists of from seven to ten thousand men, cavalry and infantry combined, with six pieces of artillery. This raid is abundantly provided for. Our cavalry have been doing splendid work. I have heard Wirt Adams's old regiment more particularly mentioned. I had begun to fear the forty wagons affair was a reliable contraband story, but to-day I learned the particulars from a participant in the affair. Two squadrons from Wirt Adams's old regiment, leWirt Adams's old regiment, led by Colonel Wood, (now commanding that gallant corps,) and supported by a small force of dismounted men under Colonel Dumontielle, charged across a small field, along the opposite side of which the enemy's wagon train was passing, heavily guarded by a line of infantry on either side. The charge was so sudden, so wild, so gallant, that the wretches felt their doom was sealed and fled in wild confusion. On dashed the avenging rebels, and while the mules and drivers struggled in confusion and