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Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 73 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wirt Adams or search for Wirt Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the cavalry in Mississippi, from January to March, 1864.-report of General S. D. Lee. (search)
ssippi brigade was at Brownsville, watching the crossings of the Big Black, opposite Vicksburg. Adams's brigade was moved from the vicinity of Natchez to Raymond. About the 28th of January the en above. They advanced towards Clinton on the two roads from the two crossings; and, on the 4th, Adams's and Starke's brigades engaged them, and it was soon discovered, after heavy skirmishing, that ade to Morton to cover Major-General Loring's front, and ordered Jackson, with his two brigades (Adams's and Starke's), to move on the flank of the enemy at Brandon and Pelahatchee stations; at the s it was then evident that he was moving on Meridian and not Mobile. On the 12th, with a part of Adams's brigade, a dash was made on the flank of the enemy at Decatur, disabling a train of about thirision, to whose assistance and action much of the credit of the recent campaign is due. Brigadier-Generals Adams and Ross and Ferguson deserve my thanks for their distinguished gallantry on the field
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. (search)
he operations of my command, consisting of three brigades, commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals Wirt Adams, L. S. Ross, and Colonel P. B. Starke, during the late advance of Sherman's army froced crossing Big Black on the afternoon of the 3d February; were met by Colonel Wood's regiment, Adams's brigade, near Champion Hill on the morning of the 4th. At the same time Starke's brigade was de had been left on the Yazoo river to defend that country. The behavior of officers and men of Adams's and Starke's brigades in resisting the advance was excellent. On arriving at Jackson my commandon. On the 7th February I moved with Starke's brigade to the rear of the enemy, near Brandon; Adams's brigade accompanied Major-General Lee on the flank of the enemy. There was but little opportuach brigade in rear of their respective brigades. At Decatur Woods's and Dumonteil's regiments, Adams's brigade, made a dash on a wagon train and succeeded in killing a number of men and mules, but
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's campaign in Mississippi in winter of 1864. (search)
fter dark. On the morning of the 20th of February, I left Almucha to reinforce General Forrest. On reaching Macon General Adams's brigade was temporarily placed under my command, thus giving me a division, with which, by forced marches I reachedm of seven (7) killed and thirty eight (38) captured; to me of one officer and one man wounded. On the following day General Adams's brigade was sent off to operate on the left flank of the enemy and south and west of Canton, and acting under Generuson, Brigadier General. Major William Elliott, Assistant Adjutant and Inspector General, Canton, Miss. Report of General Adams. Headquarters cavalry brigade, March 12th, 1864. Captain,--In obedience to orders from division headquarters,f my staff, and Lieutenant George Yerger, who volunteered his services, for efficient and valuable assistance. I am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Wirt Adams, Brigadier-General. Captain George Moorman, A. A. Gen'l J. C. D.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Hood's Tennessee campaign. (search)
over the battle-field. To those unaccustomed to such things, no description can give an idea of the sight. The dead were literally piled up, and to my sorrow I saw that our loss was much the greatest. We had pressed them into their last line, and there the dead lay mangled together. Entire companies were literally gone. And just a little back the gallant old soldier, General Pat Cleburne, lay dead. He was the idol of his command, and a better soldier never died for any cause. Brigadier-General Adams was killed, he and his horse falling together, just on the earthworks of the enemy. Our loss was about 5,000 men, including five Generals killed and six wounded. I could not but feel that the lives of these men were a useless sacrifice. It seemed to me to be a rashness occasioned by the blunder of the day before. It was an attempt to make good by reckless daring the blunder which incapacity had occasioned the preceding day. Schofield had as many or more men in Franklin than we