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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 132 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 26, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 5 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 3 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for C. F. Adams or search for C. F. Adams in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
er government. There was in the latter part of 1864 a growing feeling in the Federal States against the action of Great Britain, which, though the latter began to pay more attention to its neutral obligations (owing to the strong protests of Mr. Adams, Federal minister at the Court of St. James), still allowed these cruisers to escape to sea; and several ironclad rams, built by John Laird & Co., were preparing for sea, at Liverpool. These rams would, no doubt, have escaped but for the earnethe course of construction, and the Federal Government had, apparently, realized at last the importance of having a powerful Navy, by which alone it could maintain its position among the nations of the earth. Mr. Seward's earnest letters and Mr. Adams' strong protests may have had some influence upon the British Government in deciding them to carry out the terms of their Foreign Enlistment Act, but there was a stronger argument in the heavy ships and guns that the Federals were building so r