hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 132 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 26, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 5 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 3 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for C. F. Adams or search for C. F. Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 66 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
Howe's in the evening to meet John C. Vaughan, of Kentucky, where also were Sumner, Richard Hildreth, C. F. Adams, J. A. Andrew, and John W. Browne. Longfellow wrote in his diary, Nov. 16, 1849: Dined at Howe's. A very pleasant dinner. Palfrey, Adams, Sumner, young Dana, all and several Free Soilers. I, a singer, came into the camp as Alfred among the Danes. and who found there not only ethical inspiration, but also, in the society of both sexes, wit, culture, and the love of art and music. Sumner that a report of the kind be made. His letter of July 15, 1851, to the Story Association, Works, vol. II. pp. 442, 443. Sumner would not attend the oration or the dinner, being advised that Choate was to defend the Fugitive Slave Act. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 199. in which he recalls his loved teacher, as also two friends whom he had made in Europe,—Thibaut and Mittermaier,—marks the period of the end of his legal studies and his final withdrawal from the profession.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
rds wrote exceeded in substance the measure of Adams's severe condemnation of the vote. The Advertrop; he came to it after it had been opened by Adams, and then only at the request of friends, who 's critic, and his delay in becoming such till Adams had broken ground in the Whig, and Buckingham s life was not engrossed with home interests. Adams, such was his lineage, could not be set aside our leaders who sustained it—Sumner, Phillips, Adams, and Allen —were a combination of personal powith a resolution prepared in consultation with Adams, Sumner, and others, which proposed a test of th the safety of the Union. Later in the day, Adams, in some caustic remarks. received with hisse duties of men. These speeches of Palfrey, Adams, Sumner, and Allen met with demonstrations of articles to the Whig, taking the same view as Adams and Sumner. Dec. 29, 30, 31, 1847; Jan. 6, 8g school of politicians to which he belonged. Adams had a sharp controversy with the junior editor[11 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
and resolutions; six delegates at large, with Adams's name at the head, were chosen to attend the d a reply manly in tone, dated July 24, 1848. Adams gave it to the public Aug. 9, 1877, at the Reu would probably have insured Taylor's defeat. Adams was nominated for Vice-President. Sumner wa22, to ratify the nominations of Van Buren and Adams, and was cordially welcomed by a full and enth front before or during the Civil War,—Sumner, Adams, Wilson, Burlingame, Dana, E. R. Hoar, and And town. Saw Sumner surrounded by his captains, Adams, Allen, and Phillips They are in great fervor ergies against the supporters of Van Buren and Adams. Choate in a speech at Salem, September 28, assumed the charge of the Cincinnati Gazette. Adams, for whom the most venomous shafts were reserve new party a personal direction at Sumner and Adams,—September 21, 27; October 3, 13, 17, 28, 30. m up as deserving the penalties of treason. Adams, November 9, at Faneuil Hall, made a spirited [10 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
cuted in Boston, and assumed the direction of the prosecutions, although it properly belonged to the Attorney-General. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 228. Early in April, 1851, Thomas Sims, another negro living in Boston, was brought e did not enter the case at the beginning on account of the pending election for senator, in which he was the candidate. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. pp 183, 188, 189, 190. In association with Mr. Sewall he applied, without success, to Judgestatute of 1843 to proceedings under the new Fugitive Slave Act; and it was presented to a committee of the Legislature. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 184. The judge was unfriendly and brusque,—breaking out, when Sewall in a quiet way habiyet in the Union, tank God! It was described as a mere political clap-trap speech, intended for the Southern market. (Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 191.) The writer was present, and well remembers the scene. The room was crowded, chiefl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
ood, O'Conor, Hoffman, Brady, and Evarts. As to Evarts's support of the Fugitive Slave law, see Adams's Biography of Dana, p. 176. was addressed by B. R. Curtis and Choate; and the Compromise measus has already been described; and it now bore more heavily than before. It could not well reach Adams, whose position was fortified by family name, wealth, and marriage; but it was directed with grecute the laws of the Commonwealth when they conflicted with the interests of the slave-power. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. pp. 187, 192. The two leading journals of the city showed the tempfidence and business from men like Sumner, Mann, and Dana. June 2, signed Son of a Merchant. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 198. The Courier, in an elaborate and bitter leader, called for control my opinions. This passage between Hillard and Dana was often referred to at the time. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. pp. 237, 238. Bryant, in the New York Evening Post, denounced thes
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
to their senator. From them came numerous congratulations. Those among them who were students of public questions, like Adams, Dana, and Amasa Walker, fully approved his caution against any departure from the policy of non-intervention. He foundlitical supporters and opponents were nearly balanced. and particularly at his disposition to show favor to the West; but Adams, as well as John Bigelow, while gratified with his success, objected to his contention that the exemption of the public lands from taxation entitled the States to such grants. Adams wisely suggested that it was a better policy to give the lands to actual settlers than to bestow them in large tracts on States and corporations. There was indeed little popular interes. He had counted too much on the courteous treatment he had thus far received and his social relations with senators. Mr. Adams, more distrustful by nature, wrote, August 1:— The result at which you arrived is not in the least surprising to
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
of the effort to unite the opponents of the extension of slavery. Life and Times of Samuel Bowles, vol. i. pp. 125-127. and earnest and active as they were, exercised a predominant influence in its councils. Their most trusted leaders—Sumner, Adams, Later, in January, 1855, Adams assailed the order in a speech in New York. Allen, S. C. Phillips, Palfrey, and Andrew—had no sympathy with its aims and methods, and kept aloof from it. Others, however, had less sternness of principle or less Adams assailed the order in a speech in New York. Allen, S. C. Phillips, Palfrey, and Andrew—had no sympathy with its aims and methods, and kept aloof from it. Others, however, had less sternness of principle or less scruple as to propriety. Burlingame entered the order as early as March, 1854, and sought the nomination for Congress from Boston,—the very scat of Whig power. Wilson, while openly keeping up his connection with the Republicans, whose nomination for governor he accepted, joined the order in the late summer or early autumn, and assumed thereby, as those who had put him in nomination complained, inconsistent obligations; See his letter in Boston Atlas, October 17. About five hundred Free S
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
or quite twelve hundred persons were present during the whole evening, and hundreds on hundreds went away unable to get in. Sumner began his address, Works, vol. IV. pp. 62-82. The speech was published in full in the Boston Telegraph, November 3. the parts omitted in the Works are largely a repetition of matter contained in former speeches. Dana wrote in his diary, November 4: Sumner made a noble speech at Faneuil Hall, Friday night, before a crowded assembly, at which I presided. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 348. which occupied two hours and a quarter in the delivery, with a treatment of the issues growing out of the slavery question, including recent outrages in Kansas, and then discussed the relations of parties, insisting upon the necessity of a political organization (tile Republican party) based only upon opposition to slavery. The stress of his argument was on this point. At the same time he took occasion to reject the irrational methods of the Know Noth
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
d give strong interest to any revelation from your father's diary; but of course this could not be done without associating his name with present controversies. Adams declined at this time to make public the passages of J. Q Adams's Diary relative to the history of the Monroe doctrine which Sumner desired to use in the debate onAdams's Diary relative to the history of the Monroe doctrine which Sumner desired to use in the debate on the Clayton-Bulwer treaty. I doubt not you have judged well, and yet I part with regret from the opportunity of introducing to the country such interesting testimony. While I write Mr. Foot is speaking on Seward's lead, saying sonic things of England which, if said in Parliament about us, would set the Republic in flames. But Ening Post, August 2. The New York Times, Oct. 8, 1856, reported fully a banquet given to Brooks at Ninety-six, with speeches from himself, Toombs, Butler, and Governor Adams. Brooks spoke of himself as in his deed the type and representative of the entire South, but did not treat it as avenging Butler. Keitt, who had been re-elec
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
had most at heart, and with chances most menacing, worse than death,—you would have intrusted yourself unreservedly to medical skill which had already inspired your confidence by a most careful and intelligent diagnosis. This was a reply to Mr. Adams's protest against another recourse to the heroic remedies. Ante, p. 572. I will not now undertake to say that the painful treatment which I have endured was necessary, nor indeed that it has brought me to my present condition of convalescence perfected, from public life and from thoughts concerning it, and constantly insisting upon more exercise in the open air and less addiction to books and engravings. During his absence Sumner received letters from many friends at home,—Dr. Howe, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Adams, S. P. Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Seward, John Jay, A. G. Browne, A. B. Johnson, and E. L. Pierce; and there were occasional letters from many others. Among deaths, while he was in Europe, of friends with whom he had been more or l
1 2