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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 55 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 21 5 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 22, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 7 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Daniel W. Adams or search for Daniel W. Adams in all documents.

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ed by other troops; doing little but casting longing eyes to that wave-like line of battle which eluded them at Fort Pickens. Fighting was to be done later on in the form of fierce cannonading between Fort Pickens in the harbor and Confederate Barrancas on shore, in which fighting the pioneers from Louisiana were to have no share. At Pensacola was organized the First Louisiana infantry, under Col. A. H. Gladden, soon promoted brigadier-general, and succeeded in regimental command by Col. D. W. Adams Three companies of Louisiana troops participated in the affair on Santa Rosa island, and during the bombardment of Fort McRee and Barrancas the Louisiana contingent won honors. Lieutenant Manston, of Louisiana, commanded the gunboat Nelms, of the little navy. Three companies under Lieutenant-Colonel Jaquess served as many batteries throughout the action most efficiently and gallantly, said General Bragg. These batteries were commanded by Capt. J. T. Wheat, Capt. S. S. Batchelor, and
her Louisiana troops reported there, was the Seventh cavalry. Vincent's brigade held the Confederate front toward Opelousas. (Federal reports.) After the collapse of Banks' expedition up the river, Richard Taylor was appointed by President Davis to the command of the department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana. This department included the district of the Gulf, Maj.-Gen. Dabney H. Maury; district of North Alabama, Brig.-Gen. P. D. Roddey; district of Central Alabama, Brig.-Gen. D. W. Adams; district of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Maj.-Gen. Franklin Gardner; the fortified city of Mobile on the south, and the invincible remnant of the cavalry corps of N. B. Forrest on the north. The return for his department November 20, 1864, shows the following Louisiana troops included: In Maury's command—Twenty-second regiment infantry, brigade of Gen. Alpheus Baker. In Gardners command, brigade of Gen. George B. Hodge-First cavalry, Col. John S. Scott; Third cavalry; Col. Dani
uisiana and Twenty-second Alabama. First Louisiana regulars, infantry, Col. D. W. Adams; Fourth volunteer infantry, Col. H. W. Allen; Eleventh volunteer infantry,ouisiana brigade of the army of Tennes-see, organized under the command of Daniel W. Adams, promoted to brigadier-general. It included the Thir-teenth regiment, Colj. J. E. Austin; and Fifth company, Washington artillery, Capt. C. H. Slocomb. Adams was put in line on the extreme left, and while a fierce attack was being made oalong the line the enemy was driven back, throwing away arms and equipment, and Adams' bri-gade, with the others, followed for about a mile. The Washington artillere guns had opened the ball, followed and again opened fire. Later the whole of Adams' command was stationed on the hill from which they had driven the enemy. Whileded) were mentioned with honorable distinction: and of the Washington artillery Adams said: It did most essential and valuable service and deserves particu-lar notic
neral Polk, whose right was yet unsuccessful. Adams crossed with his brigade, and was at once throt, and T. L. McLean, and among the wounded General Adams and his adjutant, Capt. Emile P. Guillet, name, the Rock of Chickamauga. On the 18th Adams' brigade was taken by Lieut.-Gen. D. H. Hill ie right or north of the Confederate line, with Adams on the right of the division, in a line suppostle array, and a desperate fight resulted; but Adams and Stovall, steadily marching forward, scatte found themselves on the Chattanooga road, and Adams, still keeping on, dispersing a regiment and corth of the extreme north flank of Thomas. So Adams and Stovall were wheeled around facing south, the angle of the enemy's main line of works. Adams had advanced still farther, being actually in er parts of his line to hold his vital point. Adams' brigade reformed behind Slocomb's battery, whthe arms of Captain Slocomb. The staff of General Adams was also cordially commended. The courag[8 more...]
generals, pro-visional army of the Confederate States, Accredited to Louisiana. Brigadier-General Daniel W. Adams Brigadier-General Daniel W. Adams—Dan Adams, as he was familiarly called—was onBrigadier-General Daniel W. Adams—Dan Adams, as he was familiarly called—was one of the gallant leaders so well known in the military operations in Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama and Mississippi. At the call to arms in 1861 he hastened to the defense of the South and entered thebson and his regiment participated in the Kentucky campaign of the summer and fall of 1862. Gen. D. W. Adams, in his report of the battle of Perryville, three times mentions Colonel Gibson in terms of was back in the army of Tennessee in time for the battle of Chickamauga. On the first day Gen. D. W. Adams was wounded, and Colonel Gibson again took command of the brigade. He commanded the brigarigadier-general and assigned to command of a brigade, including the First regiment, of which D. W. Adams then became colonel. He was in command of his brigade during the bombardment of the Confede