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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 311 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 100 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 94 8 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 74 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 68 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 54 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Adams or search for John Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 10 document sections:

the task, of construing the Constitution of a great nation, as you would an indictment to rescue a culprit. His object was to preserve and enforce it, not to escape from it by little technical subterfuges. He wished to perpetuate, not to destroy. He gave no countenance to a doctrine, an innovation which would be fatal to the Federal Government, fatal to the Union, and fatal to the hopes of liberty and humanity, and present a catastrophe at which all ought to shudder. Mr. Webster and Mr. Adams, too, have been invoked to support the heresy. What desecration! If their spirits had been permitted to revisit the Senate Chamber, so often the theatre of their fame and glory, and to have heard the invocation, can you not imagine the sternness and indignation with which they would instantly have rebuked so unfounded an imputation on their wisdom and patriotism — Webster the advocate or the apologist of secession? His speech already referred to, of January, 1830, in almost every line o
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 16.-twenty-sixth Penn. Regiment. (search)
Doc. 16.-twenty-sixth Penn. Regiment. The following is a list of the officers:-- Colonel, William F. Small; Lieut.-Colonel, Rush Van Dyke; Major, Casper M. Berry; Adjutant, Joseph Dickenson; Surgeon, S. J. W. Mintzer; Assistant-Surgeon, S. Cohen; Quartermaster, J. L. Adler; Sergeant-Major, S. Wigner; Quartermaster-Sergeant, S. Hamilton; Commissary, R. L. Bodine; Chaplain, Rev. Mr. Beck; Hospital Steward, L. Gerhard; and Captains: Maffit, Co. A; Adams, Co. B; Young. Co. C; Swink, Co. D; Ramlin, Co. E; Thomas, Co. F; Goodfellow, Co. G; Tilghman, Co. H; Webb, Co. I; and Grubb, Co. K.--National Intelligencer, June 20.
Doc. 19.-letters of John Adams. New York, May 26, 1789. Dear sir :--I am this evening favored with yours of the 18. In answer to your question, I ask another. Where is the Sovereignty of the Nation lodged? Is it in the National Government, or in the State Governments? Are there more Sovereignties than one? if there, that nobody this way has doubted it None will ever doubt it, but those who wish to annul the National Government. I am, dear Sir, your affectionate friend, John Adams. His Honour Lt.-Governor Lincoln. New York, June 19, 1789. Dear sir:--I am honoured with yours of the 30th of May, and find we are well agreed in opinion ied openly, or secretly, in favor of it, would be a serious evil. I hope, however, that my fears are groundless, and have too much charity for all of them to imagine that they mean to disturb the peace of our Israel. With great regard, I am, Sir, your most obt. John Adams. General Lincoln. --Boston Advertiser, June 19.
der States' propositions were projected by a gentleman from Maryland, and presented by a member from Tennessee, and, with Mr. Crittenden's propositions, were repeatedly and severally rejected in this House by the almost unanimous vote of the Republicans. Mr. Crittenden's Compromise, which received the vote of every Southern member upon this floor, excepting one from Arkansas, never on any one occasion received one solitary vote from the Republicans in the Senate or House. The so-called Adams' Amendment, moderate as that was, was carried through this chamber by the bare majority of one, after a severe struggle. Sixty-five Republicans voted to the last against it. Up to twelve o'clock on the 4th of March, peace seemed to be the policy of all parties, when Mr. Lincoln delivered his inaugural, and which left thirty millions of people in doubt whether it meant peace or war. Under this confidence in the restoration of peace, the prosperity of the country revived, Secession in the
e, their children, no years of toil, of sacrifice, and of battle even, if need be, to give, to save it from absolute destruction at the hands of men who, steeped in guilt, are perpetrating against us and humanity a crime, for which I verily believe the blackest page of the history of the world's darkest period furnishes no parallel! Can it be possible that in the history of the American people we have already reached a point of degeneracy so low, that the work of Washington and Franklin, of Adams and Jefferson, of Hancock and Henry, is to be overthrown by the morally begrimed and pig-mied conspirators who are now tugging at its foundation? It would be the overturning of the Andes by the miserable reptiles that are crawling in the sands at their base. But our neutral fellow-citizens in the tenderness of their hearts say: This effusion of blood sickens us. Then do all in your power to bring it to an end. Let the whole strength of this commonwealth be put forth in support of the Go
e-shots. The main body, however, remained hidden in masked batteries. Renewed volleys brought down the men of Capt. Carruth's company by half dozens, although Capt. Adams' men escaped without loss. Capt. Adams' company, however, rendered the most effective service at this point by covering the retreat of one of our guns. While Capt. Adams' company, however, rendered the most effective service at this point by covering the retreat of one of our guns. While the skirmish was going on so briskly, Gen. Tyler had sent down two howitzers from Ayres' battery to the assistance of our men. With extreme intrepidity, they ran their pieces rapidly down the hill and into the woods, until they reached the edge of the dry water-course, before spoken of, at the outlet of which a small battery was nowas exhausted, and then prepared to withdraw. A disposition to capture one of the howitzers was manifested by a small party of the enemy, but the appearance of Capt. Adams' company restrained this unusual demonstration of spirit. Simultaneously with these events, the New York 12th regiment had marched down to the woods at the e
epid valor of Wayne, found it impossible to hold the province against the superior force which the opening of the spring enabled the British to throw into the St. Lawrence, and the American army retreated out of Canada, in the emphatic words of John Adams, disgraced, defeated, discontented, dispirited, diseased, undisciplined, eaten up with vermin, no clothes, beds, blankets, nor medicines, and no victuals but salt pork and flour, and a scanty supply of those. The disastrous defeat at Brooklyis retreat to the mouth of the Mohawk. The loss of Ticonderoga with its numerous artillery, and the subsequent rapid disasters, came like a thunderbolt on Congress and the Northern States. We shall never be able to defend a post! --so wrote John Adams in a private letter. He was at that time President of the Board of War--would to heaven our Board of War had such a head!--we shall never be able to defend a post till we shoot a general. Disasters, the unavoidable result of weakness, were as
ty to discuss, in a measure, the nature of this so-called blockade. Representatives of the United States meet me with two statements, the force of which it will be for your lordships to decide. I am told by some that there is no pretensions on the part of the United States of a blockade existing; that the Government is merely closing its own ports, to do which they claim to have a perfect right. In direct conflict with this are all the official notifications of United States officers. Capt. Adams, for instance, writing on board the Sabine, on May 19, says in a letter to Gen. Bragg: This (Pensacola) port is now strictly blockaded, &c. Commodore Mervin's announcements — I have not seen any of them — are said to be similarly worded; and I am told that the President of the United States publicly promulgated the blockade of all the ports south of Baltimore, (which is in the State of Maryland.) A prominent feature of this alleged blockade is the complete absence of uniformi
nd Clark of Missouri were severely wounded--Gen. Price slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and Weaver--all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment--Lieut.-Col. Neal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor, and Saddler, were wounded while at the head of their companies. Where all were doing their duty so gallantly, it is almost unfair to discriminate. I must, however, bring to your notice, the gallant conduct of the Missouri Generals — McBride, Parsons, Clark, Black, and their officers. To Gen. Price, I am under many obligations for assistance on the battle-field. He was at the head of his force leading them on and sustaming them by his gallant bearing. Gen. Pearce w
nd Clark of Missouri were severely wounded--Gen. Price slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and Weaver--all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment--Lieut.-Col. Neal, Major H. Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieutenants Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor, and Saddler, were wounded while at the head of their companies. Where all were doing their duty so gallantly, it is almost unfair to discriminate. I must, however, bring to your notice, the gallant conduct of the Missouri Generals — McBride, Parsons, Clark, Black, and their officers. To Gen. Price, I am under many obligations for assistance on the battle-field. He was at the head of his force leading them on and sustaming them by his gallant bearing. Gen. Pearce w