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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 311 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 100 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 94 8 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 74 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 68 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 54 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for John Adams or search for John Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
New York. While at sea, he was poisoned, we are told, by eating of a dolphin, caught off the copper banks of Cape Hatteras. The vessel made a rapid passage to New York, reaching there on the 14th, and he was taken on shore without delay. He was already in the height of a fever, and bereft of reason; and he died on the morning of Wednesday, Sept. 16, at the age of thirty-five. He was buried the next day with the respect due to his memory. His funeral was attended by the Vice-President (John Adams), the Secretary of War (Henry Knox), and the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Massachusetts. The first Congress under the Constitution was then in session in New York. His pall was upheld by eight officers of the late army: General Webb, and Colonels Bauman, Walker, Hamilton, Willet, Platt, Smith, and White. The hearse was preceded by a regiment of artillery and the Society of the Cincinnati. New York Journal and Weekly Register, Sept. 16, 1789: Gazette of the United St
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 3: birth and early Education.—1811-26. (search)
son. Early in the morning of that day, the young men of Boston, having formed in procession at the State House, went to the First Church in Chauncy Place, where, with solemn services, they commemorated the deceased ex-Presidents. The scholars of the Latin School were assigned a place in the procession. At a later hour, Faneuil Hall was not large enough to contain the multitude which pressed for admission. Charles at length forced his way in, just in time to hear the imagined speech of John Adams in favor of the Declaration of Independence, which, according to the newspapers of the day, was the most impressive passage of the oration. Never has a youth, when passing from one interesting period of study to another, had a more precious opportunity than was enjoyed by this boy of fifteen, who was then fortunate enough to listen to such orators as Daniel Webster and John Quincy Adams. One who was in the same division of his class relates an incident which illustrates his acquisition
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
ho entered Sumner's class in the spring of 1832, and whose acquaintance he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. He resided at Zanesville, and died in 1860. Gibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. Channing. He was the author of the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. He resided at Washington during our Civil War, and died April 9, 1873. He assisted Sumner in procuring and arranging the materials for his speech on the purchase of Alaska. His manuscripts, containing researches on the Indians of the Northwest, are deposited in the Smithsonian Institution. Sumner, in his Sketch of the Law School, referred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the latter was under the age of majority. American Jurist, Jan., 1835, Vol. XIII. p. 120. With each o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
tory would it be, were he made Chief-Justice of the United States! Chief-Justice Marshall, who was appointed by President John Adams in 1801, died July 6, 1835, and was succeeded by Roger B. Taney, of Maryland, who held the office till his death, application was not successful, but he was afterwards appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States by President Adams. . . . Yours truly, Chas. Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, Jan. 9, 1836. my dear friend,—Before youBoston, Sept. 11, 1837. my dear Lieber,—On Nepotism, see a capital letter of General Washington, written in 1797, to John Adams. Works of John Adams, Vol.VIII. p. 530. Sparks's Life and Writings of George Washington, Vol. XI. p. 188. Lieber haJohn Adams, Vol.VIII. p. 530. Sparks's Life and Writings of George Washington, Vol. XI. p. 188. Lieber had applied to Sumner by letter, Sept. 2, 1835, while writing his Political Ethics, for information relative to the appointment of Bushrod Washington to an office. Ante, p. 173. Lieber's Political Ethics (1875), Vol. II. pp. 30-34. Sumner, in a speec