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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 311 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 100 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 94 8 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 74 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 68 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 54 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for John Adams or search for John Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
ting gave him the keenest enjoyment. No day was to him complete, whose morning mail did not bring him a packet of letters; and all who are familiar with his daily life will recall the zest with which he opened and read them. He was always interested in the literary projects of his friends, and answered readily calls for help in obtaining materials, George Gibbs sought his intervention for the purpose of procuring original papers for the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. revising manuscripts and proofs, and in securing the attention of publishers. He was a good critic, and was never weary in serving authors whose works merited a place in libraries. Letters. To Judge Story, Washington, D. C. Boston, Feb. 5, 1845. my dear Judge,β€”In my last letter, I referred to the terms which a Senator Mr. Webster. had made with his friends, before he consented to be chosen. They were fifty thousand dollars to be subscribed in Boston, and the same sum
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
another to his many triumphs. But generally, from the early period to the present, young men under thirty or thirty-five have been selected for the service. John Adams wrote in 1816 of these orations Letter to Dr. J. Morse, 5 January, 1816. Works of John Adams, Vol. X. pp. 203, 204:β€” The town of Boston instituted anJohn Adams, Vol. X. pp. 203, 204:β€” The town of Boston instituted an annual oration in commemoration of this catastrophe [ the battle of King Street, on the 5th of March, 1770 ], upon the danger of standing armies stationed in populous cities in time of peace, and among the first orators were such names as Hancock, Warren, and Lovell. These orations were read, I had almost said by every body tharaditions. The others, even when speaking well for the country or summoning to some important duty, never jarred on popular thought and sentiment, but were, as John Adams described them, conformable to the prevailing opinions of the moment. The committee of the city government, charged in 1845 with the duty of selecting the or