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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 311 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 100 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 94 8 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 74 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 68 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 54 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for John Adams or search for John Adams in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
and had fourteen children, among them Samuel, who in turn became Governor of the Colony, and a member of the Continental Congress. He was the only Colonial governor who refused to take the oath to enforce the Stamp Act. In 1775, in the Continental Congress, he was made Chairman of the Committee of the Whole, which from 1774 to 1776 sat daily, working without intermission in the cause of independence. But though one of the framers of the Declaration, he was not destined to be a signer. John Adams says of him, When he was seized with the smallpox he said that if his vote and voice were necessary to support the cause of his country, he should live; if not, he should die. He died, and the cause of his country was supported, but it lost one of its most sincere and punctual advocates. The correspondence between Governor Ward and General Washington has been preserved. In one letter the latter says: I think, should occasion offer, I shall be able to give you a good account of your son
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
ate Chamber by Preston Brooks of South Carolina. Chev is as you might expect under such circumstances; he has had much to do with meetings here, etc., etc. New England spunk seems to be pretty well up, but what will be done is uncertain as yet. One thing we have got: the Massachusetts Legislature has passed the personal liberty bill, which will effectually prevent the rendition of any more fugitive slaves from Massachusetts. Another thing, the Tract Society here (orthodox) has put out old Dr. Adams, who published a book in favor of slavery; a third thing, the Connecticut legislature has withdrawn its invitation to Mr. Everett to deliver his oration before them, in consequence of his having declined to speak at the Sumner meeting in Faneuil Hall.... To her sister Annie Cincinnati, May 26, 1857. Casa Greenis. Dearest Annie, Fiancee de marbre et Femme de glace, Heaven knows what I have not been through with since I saw you — dust, dirt, dyspepsia, hotels, railroads, prairies, We
Index Abbott, J., I, 214, 215; II, 99. Abdin Palace, II, 35, 36. Abdul Hamid II, II, 42. Abdul Hassan, mosque of, II, 36. Aberdeen, Countess of, II, 165, 166. Aberdeen, J. C. H. Gordon, Earl of, II, 165. Abolitionists, I, 177, 305; II, 171. Academy of Fine Arts, French, II, 23. Acroceraunian Mountains, I, 272. Acropolis, II, 43. Adamowski, Timothee, II, 55, 58. Adams, Charles Follen, II, 270, 273; verse by, II, 335. Adams, Mrs. C. F., I, 266. Adams, John, I, 4. Adams, John Quincy, II, 312. Adams, Nehemiah, I, 168. Advertiser, Boston, II, 195, 222. Aegina, I, 73. Aeschylus, II, 130, 282, 348, 372. Agassiz, Alexander, II, 50. Agassiz, Elizabeth Cary, I, 124, 345, 361; II, 228, 287, 292. Agassiz, Louis, I, 124, 151, 251, 345; II, 150, 158. Aide, Hamilton, II, 251. Airlie, Lady, II, 254. Alabama, II, 108. Albania, I, 272. Albany, I, 342. Albert of Savoy, II, 303. Albert Victor, II, 9. Albinola, Si