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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 311 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 100 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 94 8 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 74 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 68 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 54 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for John Adams or search for John Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
ed aside from his project by the times and his friends. He talked, too, a good deal of politics, and as freely as Carmignani, but with less discretion and good sense. May 25.—Carmignani, who cannot receive visits at his house, because it is undergoing great repairs, came to see me again this morning, and sent me Mazzei's Memoirs of himself and a quantity of letters and papers from Franklin, Jefferson, the King of Poland,—Stanislaus, —whose Charge d'affaires he was at Paris, Abbe Mably, John Adams, etc. It all looked very curious, some of it quite piquant; but I could only read a little, for it is a large folio volume of about four hundred closely written pages. What I did read, however, gave me the impression that Mazzei was a mere adventurer. Mr. G. T. Curtis, in recalling facts about his uncle, illustrating the retentiveness of his memory, says, I was sitting with Mr. Ticknor one day in his library, about a year before his death, when he was rather feeble in health. That emi<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
al truth and integrity to which it was always safe and patriotic to conform. He therefore belonged to whatever party in the country gave the most trustworthy assurance of adhering to the Constitution and preserving the Union, with least variation from the principles of its founders. He belonged to a generation which began life while yet the discussions connected with the first creation of the United States government were fresh in men's minds; when the opinions of Washington, Hamilton, and Adams were familiarly known; and he lived through a period when the progress of the nation was remarkably rapid, well-balanced in material, moral, and intellectual growth, and guided by men of worth as well as of ability. As his generation began to pass away, an enormous material development, immense immigration, and eager divergence into sectional parties, changed the character of the country in several important respects. His intercourse in Europe with men distinguished both as leading stat
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
ravagance, the spendthrift character of the mass of the people, goes deeper than all their moneyed institutions. This, I think, is likely to be diminished for a good while. . . . . Our politics are in a state of great confusion. As the elder Adams President John Adams. said to me, when he was eighty-nine years old, about the politics of the State of New York for seventy years previous, they are the Devil's incomprehensibles. The reason is that the old parties are breaking up, and the nPresident John Adams. said to me, when he was eighty-nine years old, about the politics of the State of New York for seventy years previous, they are the Devil's incomprehensibles. The reason is that the old parties are breaking up, and the new ones are not yet sufficiently formed and organized to be intelligible. The great contest, as you know, is about Kansas. Buchanan has behaved as badly as possible about it; the leaders of the Free Soil party no better. Both have treated it as a game for political power. It has been just as certain for nearly two years, as it is now admitted to be by everybody, that Kansas will be a free State, and yet, as each party has believed that it could profit more by the contest than its adversary c
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
arl of, II. 364, 365, 368, 372. Ackenbladt, J. D., I. 179. Acland, Dr., II. 432. Acton, Sir John (Lord), II. 873 and note, 374, 396, 397. Adair, Right Hon. Sir Robert, I. 269. Adams, Hon., Charles Francis, I. 459, II. 493. Adams, John, President U. S., I. 12, 13, 30, 330, 339, II. 408; death of, I. 377; eulogy on, by Webster, 378. Adams, John Quincy, President U. S., I. 12, 49, 54, 339, 349, 409, 459. Adams, Mrs., John, I. 13. Adams, Mrs., John Quincy, I. 349. Adderley, RigAdams, Mrs., John, I. 13. Adams, Mrs., John Quincy, I. 349. Adderley, Right Hon. Charles, II. 358, 363, 419. Addington, Mr., I. 350, 411. Adelaide, Madame, II. 121. Agassiz, Louis, I. 421 and note, II. 231 and note, 310, 412, 414, 422, 423, 432, 438, 445 and note, 471, 482; letter to, 472. Aiken, Charles, I. 416. Alba, Count da, I. 248, 249. Albani, Cardinal, I. 181. Albany, Countess of, I. 183, 184, II. 57. Albemarle, Earl of, II 149, 150. Alberi, Professor, Eugenio, II. 315. Albert, Prince, Consort, II. 429. Alberti, Count, Tasso Mss., I