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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
tics. He was willing to do what he could for me in German, but he warned me that his pronunciation was very bad, as was that of all Alsace, which had become a part of France. Nor was it possible to get books. I borrowed a Meidinger's Grammar, French and German, from my friend, Mr. Everett, and sent to New Hampshire, where I knew there was a German Dictionary, and procured it. I also obtained a copy of Goethe's Werther in German (through Mr. William S. Shaw's connivance) from amongst Mr. J. Q. Adams's books, deposited by him, on going to Europe, in the Athenaeum, under Mr. Shaw's care, but without giving him permission to lend them. I got so far as to write a translation of Werther, but no farther. I was thus occupied through the summer and autumn of 1814. It was all very agreeable. I enjoyed my pursuits and mode of life very much. I had been much in whatever was most agreeable and intellectual in the society of Boston for four years, and was really familiar with it. A few a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
Secretary invited me to go next; but I avoided it, and entered with him, the last. Mrs. Madison was of course at the head of the table; but, to my surprise, the President sat at her right hand, with a seat between them vacant. Secretary Coles was at the foot. As I was about to take my place by him, the President desired me to come round to him, and seeing me hesitate as to the place, spoke again, and fairly seated me between himself and Mrs. M. This was unquestionably the result of President Adams's introduction. I looked very much like a fool, I have no doubt, for I felt very awkwardly. As in the drawing-room before dinner, no one was bold enough to venture conversation. The President did not apparently know the guest on his right, nor the one opposite to him. . . . Mrs. Madison is a large, dignified lady, with excellent manners, obviously well practised in the ways of the world. Her conversation was somewhat formal, but on the whole appropriate to her position, and now an
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
April, 1815. He had the happiness of the companionship of four of his most valued and intimate friends,—Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Perkins, Mr. Edward Everett, and Mr. Haven, of Portsmouth, N. H. Among other passengers were two young sons of Mr. John Quincy Adams, on their way to join their father, then United States Minister at St. Petersburg. Mr. Ticknor wrote many pages during his voyage to his father and mother, full of affection and cheering thoughts, and giving incidents and details, to anterest. . . . . I fear, my dear father, that you may be anxious about my going to the Continent, in consequence of the change of affairs in France. I assure you there is not the least occasion for anxiety. . . . . It is not at all dangerous. Mr. Adams, who arrived in town the same day that we did, assures us there is, and will be, no hazard or embarrassment in going now, or after hostilities have commenced, even directly to France, much less to Holland, and to a university which knows no cha
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
th him. His whole visit among us was an unbroken triumph, which he enjoyed with the greatest openness. . I carried him to Quincy to see President Adams and Mr. J. Q. Adams, . . . . and we met them afterwards at table at Mr. Quincy's. Mr. J. Q. Adams made a most extraordinary attack on the character of Chancellor Bacon, saying thMr. J. Q. Adams made a most extraordinary attack on the character of Chancellor Bacon, saying that his Essays give proof of a greater corruption of heart, of a more total wickedness, than any book he ever saw. Our New York Chancellor expressed the most simple and natural astonishment at this, and we got over the matter the next day, at dinner, by drinking to the Memory of Chancellor Bacon, with all his faults, a toast which Mant to the Chancellor, among all the delicate and indirect compliments that were offered to him among us, and which was very appropriate at a table where were Mr. J. Q. Adams, Mr. Prescott, etc. It was, Nature, who repeals all political Constitutions by the great Constitution of mind. And Webster, on the same occasion, made a plea
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
e rest of the party, and asked me a great many questions about the practical operation of the ballot in the United States, and gave his opinion very freely on the relations of the two countries. He said that as we get along further from the period of our Revolution and the feelings that accompanied it, we get along easier together; that Jefferson and Madison disliked England so much that they took every opportunity to make difficulty; that Monroe was a more quiet sort of person, but that J. Q. Adams hated England; and that they much preferred the present administration, which seemed sincerely disposed to have all things easy and right. He asked if Van Buren was likely to be the next President. I told him I thought he would be. He said he was a pleasant and agreeable man, but he did not think him so able as Mr. McLane, who preceded him. As Ministers of the United States to England. He asked if there was no chance for Webster. I told him I thought there was but little. He said t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
ught quite equal to any of the family for talent, beside which he is a better scholar than any of them. then staying there. On September 18, the day following their arrival at Mulgrave Castle, Mr. Ticknor says:— We began our excursion by stopping in a small village belonging to Lord Mulgrave. We wished to get a little information from the clergyman, but he was not at home. I was sorry for it, for Mr. Villiers told me he is one of the last specimens now remaining of Fieldings Parson Adams, sometimes dining with Lord and Lady Mulgrave, and finishing the evening drinking beer in their servants' hall. I saw the house in which the profligate Duke of Buckingham took refuge from the plague, in the time of Charles II. His tenantry were rejoiced to have him among them, as Lord Mulgrave told me, did him all honor and made him as comfortable as possible, and, when he went away, crowded about him and asked when he would come again. With the next plague, said the gracious landlord, an
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
alf past 10 it was all over. This, however, is the custom here, where all the hours are early, both in families and society. I was presented to most of the foreign ministers and leading persons present; and, though it was neither a very interesting nor a very amusing evening, I dare say I shall go there occasionally to see what it is. The old General Watzdorff himself-between seventy and eighty—seemed a very good, kind person. He was Saxon Minister in St. Petersburg in 1810-12, and knew Mr. Adams very well, to whose son Charles he was godfather. December 6.—We dined one day at half past 1 o'clock at Count Bose's, Mr. Ticknor says elsewhere: Count Bose has been in the diplomatic service of Saxony, and was for some time Grand Marshal of the Court, but now lives chiefly on a large estate of his wife's, in Lithuania. She was a Countess Lowenstein, and at St. Petersburg, in 1810-11,. . . . knew Alexander Everett and Frank Gray very well, and seemed to remember them very distinctl
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
405. Ackerbaldt, J. D., 179. Adair, Right Hon. Sir Robert, 269. Adams, Hon., Charles Francis, 459. Adams, J., President of the United States, 12, 13, 30, 330, 339; death of, 377; eulogy on, by Webster, 378. Adams, Mrs. J., 13. Adams, J. Q., President of the United States, 12, 49, 54, 339, 349, 409, 459. Adams, Mrs. J. Q., 349. Addington, Mr., 350, 411. Agassiz, Louis, 421 and note. Aiken, Charles, 416. Alba, Count da, 248, 249. Albani, Cardinal, 181. Albany, Countess of,Adams, Mrs. J. Q., 349. Addington, Mr., 350, 411. Agassiz, Louis, 421 and note. Aiken, Charles, 416. Alba, Count da, 248, 249. Albani, Cardinal, 181. Albany, Countess of, 183, 184. Aldobrandini, Princess, 256 and note. See Borghese, Princess. Alfieri Vittorio, 184. Alhambra, 230, 231, 232 and note. Alison, Dr., 427. Alison, Mrs., 426, 427. Alison, Rev. Dr., 280, 414. Allen, John, 265, 408. Allston, Washington, 316 and note, 388. Almack's, 296, 412, 413. American Institute, G T. lectures before, 393. Amiens, Bishop of, 254. Amsterdam, visits, 69. Ancillon, J. P. F., 496, 497, 499-603. Ancona, visits, 167. Anderson, Dr., 274,