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Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 73 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wirt Adams or search for Wirt Adams in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
. Brigade Christian Association organized, with Colonel Battle as president. I was elected one of the secretaries. Countersign at night was Lee. August 28 and 29. Colonel Battle received his commission as Brigadier-General, and at night was serenaded by a brass band from Doles' Georgia brigade. He responded in a very pretty speech. Judge Jones, General B. Graves, of Tuskegee, and Captain J. J. Hutchinson made short speeches August 30. Sunday, Chaplain Moore preached. Afterwards Dr. Adams and I rode to Montpelier, once the residence of James Madison. A young lady showed us the parlor, library and dining-room. They had some costly paintings and busts. The grounds around the mansion and the view of the Blue Ridge Mountains were beautiful. At night twenty-two soldiers joined the church. August 31. Colonel Pickens was on court martial, Captain Fischer, of company A on detail, so Adjutant Gayle informed me I was in command of the 12th Alabama regiment. At 9 o'clock I ins
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The dismemberment of Virginia. (search)
side, to George Clinton and George Mason, on the other, who regarded the new system as anything but an experiment entered upon by the States, and from which each and every State had the right peaceably to withdraw, a right which was very likely to be exercised. Speaking to the same effect, Woodrow Wilson declares that the men of that time would certainly have laughed at any such idea as that of a national government constituting an indestructible bond of union for the States. ExPresi-dent Adams, in an address delivered in 1839, said that should alienation of feeling take place, it would be far better for the people of the dis-United States to part in friendship from each other than to be held together by constraint. Then, said he, will be the time for reverting to the precedents which occurred at the formation and adoption of the Constitution, to form again a more perfect Union, by dissolving that which could no longer bind, and to leave the separate parts to be re-united by the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fragments of war history relating to the coast defence of South Carolina, 1861-‘65, and the hasty preparations for the Battle of Honey Hill, November 30, 1864. (search)
rmishing with head of naval brigade, which had advanced in that direction from the landing—by taking the wrong road. Company I—John Lawson Seabrook, captain; T. Warren Mikell, first lieutenant; John M. Jenkins, second lieutenant; Benj. Bailey, third lieutenant; (from Charleston and neighboring sea islands), 20 men. Company I (Rebel Troop) was in camp at Pocataligo, but had detachments permanently assigned at different points—ten men, under Corporal J. M. Seabrook, were at headquarters, Adams Run, as guides and scouts; another detachment was on outpost duty at Port Royal Ferry and adjacent posts; only one-half of the company could be ordered to Honey Hill—about 40 men; one-half of these while on the march were ordered to Mackey's Point on news that part of the enemy's fleet was approaching there. This accounts for only twenty men being in action of 30th at Honey Hill. Company K—W. B. Peeples, captain; W. H. Hewlett, first lieutenant; Richard Johnson, second lieutenant (ab
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
ed the Confederate cavalry. There is, first of all, our own glorious Wheeler, Bedford Forrest, J. E. B. Stuart, Hampton, our own gallant and chivalrous Kelley, our own W. W. Allen, Fitzhugh Lee, Martin, Humes, VanDorn, Robinson, Chalmers, Hagan, Adams, Armstrong, Ashby, Brewer, Williams, John H. Morgan, Basil Duke, Iverson, Brewer, Wade, Clanton, John T. Morgan, Roddy, Buford, Wailes, Prather, our own Tom Brown, Terry and Wharton, Charley Ball and a host of others, good and true men, of whose lay King. He deserves a better fate. Let me tell you one instance showing the gallantry of of this man: At Booneville, Miss., while we were led by General Chalmers, with the 8th Confederate on the left, Clanton's 1st Alabama in the center and Wirt Adams on the right, we charged upon a force under General Sheridan at Booneville, Miss. Clay King's battalion was left to protect our rear. We had driven the Federal cavalry away while they were feeding their horses on wheat, and Clay King permitted