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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Aeschylus or search for Aeschylus in all documents.

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Louisville Journal, however, shows that the word is of Grecian birth, as will be seen by the following extract from an article in that paper: The primitive of skedaddle is a pure Greek word of great antiquity. It occurs in Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon, and it was used to express in Greek the very idea that we undertake, in using it, to express in English. Homer, in the Iliad, uses only the aorist eskedasa or skedasa. Thus in Iliad 19: 171, we have skedason laon, for scattering, dispersing. In Prometheus, Aeschylus thus uses it (skeda) in making the sun disperse the hoar frost of the morn. And again Prometheus uses this word in predicting woes upon Jupiter, when he says that a flame more potent than the lightning shall be invented, which shall (skeda) shiver the ocean-trident, the spear of Neptune. In the Odyssey, we find Homer using skedasis in describing the scattering of the suitors of Penelope when Ulysses should come